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Letter from Thomas B. Reed to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Speaker of the House Reed believes it was his duty to "go in again" and that his refusal to stand for reelection would make things unsatisfactory in his state giving present conditions. Reed expresses distaste for Chairman of the Republican National Committee Marcus Hanna's "coarse ways," but it will not deter Reed from doing what "ought to be done."

 

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Presidents--Elections; Political campaigns; Intra-party disagreements (Political parties); Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- ); Republican National Committee (U.S.); United States. Congress. House; Hanna, Marcus Alonzo, 1837-1904

Date: 1896-07-28

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Booker T. Washington

Description:

President Roosevelt writes to Booker T. Washington, sending his regrets that he must give up his visit south to Tuskegee for the present. Roosevelt also asks Washington when he plans on coming north, as he wishes to talk over the question of future appointments in the South along the lines of their previous conversation.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Local officials and employees--Selection and appointment; Travel--Planning; African American politicians; Alabama--Tuskegee; Tuskegee Institute

Date: 1901-09-14

New judge takes oath

Description:

Thomas Goode Jones was sworn in as judge of the United States District Court for the Middle and Northern Districts of Alabama. The article lists many people who were present at the event, and also recounts Jones' words before being sworn in, as well as his oath of office.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Judges--Selection and appointment; Oaths; Alabama; United States. District Court (Alabama : Middle District); United States. District Court (Alabama : Northern District); Jones, Thomas Goode, 1844-1914

Date: 1901-10-11

Speech of President Roosevelt at New York Chamber of Commerce banquet

Description:

President Roosevelt, in his speech to the New York Chamber of Commerce, congratulates the assembly on their efficiency and forthrightness in their economic dealings, which he praises as characteristic of the United States. He continues that the United States is successful enough to not be jealous of other successful nations, and to help weaker nations like Cuba and China. The United States embraces peace due to a "genuine desire for self-respecting friendship with our neighbors" rather than weakness. In addition to international peace, he also speaks to domestic peace in an industrial society, particularly between employers and employees. This is the press copy of Roosevelt's speech.

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: International relations; Industrial relations; New York (State)--New York; Cuba; China; United States. Navy

Date: 1902

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Henry Cabot Lodge

Description:

President Roosevelt assures Senator Lodge that he will not go to Meyer Bloomfield's meeting. He also encloses a letter from Judge Holmes, whom he recently nominated to a seat on the Supreme Court, and asks Lodge how to respond.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Judges--Selection and appointment; Nominations for office; United States. Supreme Court; Holmes, Oliver Wendell, 1841-1935

Date: 1902-08-19

Remarks of President Roosevelt at Bridgeport, Connecticut

Description:

President Roosevelt offers brief remarks to the crowd at Bridgeport, Connecticut, expressing his gratitude for the reception he has been given, and apologizes for not giving a formal address in light of his recent carriage accident which injured him and killed William Craig, a member of his Secret Service.

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: Spanish-American War (1898); Gratitude; Death; Carriages and carts--Accidents; Grand Army of the Republic; Craig, William, 1855-1902

Date: 1902-09-03

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Henry Cabot Lodge

Description:

President Roosevelt thanks Senator Lodge for his letters. Roosevelt plans to write to C. H. Ames at once, as he appreciated the letter from him, as well as the one from Fannie Hardy Eckstorm. Roosevelt approves of Lodge's Portland speech. If Lodge can visit on the morning of September 16, Roosevelt has arranged for a private car on the 11:00 a.m. train. In the postscript, Roosevelt adds that he has instructed Postmaster General Payne to appoint Francis Henry Bristow of Elkton, Kentucky, to the local postmaster position there. 

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Speeches, addresses, etc.; Local officials and employees--Selection and appointment; New York (State)--New York--Long Island City; Kentucky--Elkton; Maine--Portland; United States Postal Service; Ames, C. H.; Payne, Henry C. (Henry Clay), 1843-1904; Eckstorm, Fannie Pearson Hardy, 1865-1946

Date: 1902-09-10

Address of President Roosevelt at Cincinnati, Ohio

Description:

President Roosevelt addresses his audience in Cincinnati, Ohio, on the subject of trusts and corporations, and the factors and difficulties that the government must consider when contemplating regulation of the trusts. He begins by tracing some of the conditions that have led up to the present situation, and compares the trusts to the Mississippi River, which helps many people but can also threaten great destruction. He makes the analogy that while damming the Mississippi would be futile and harmful, building levees can offer protections without obstructing the river. Roosevelt continues by saying that while there should be some regulation, this must be carefully done so as to effect the desired result on the largest trusts and corporations without imposing more difficult penalties on smaller companies and the laborers who work for the companies.

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: Corporations--Law and legislation; Trusts, Industrial--Government policy; Banks and banking; Railroads; Tariff; Mississippi River; Standard Oil Company

Date: 1902-09-20

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Henry Cabot Lodge

Description:

President Roosevelt writes to Senator Lodge about his leg trouble after the recent deadly carriage accident he was involved with, and is grateful he was able to give his speech on trusts and the tariff in spite of it. He is glad to hear Lodge's daughter Constance Davis Lodge Gardner is recovering. Roosevelt confides that his leg was treated just in time, as there was beginning to be trouble with the bone, but he believes it will be all right. He wishes Washington, D.C., was closer to Nahant, Massachusetts, so he could see Lodge.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Leg--Wounds and injuries; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Tariff; Trusts, Industrial; Presidents--Health

Date: 1902-09-25

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Henry Cabot Lodge

Description:

President Roosevelt writes to Senator Lodge regarding the Anthracite Coal Strike, but at present he has not been able to find any methods that would allow the national government to influence the strike. Roosevelt compares the tariff and the strike by saying that in either case, if people are not able to get the goods they need, they will blame the government. Roosevelt will continue to confer with the parties, although he feels like he is at his wits' end for how to proceed constructively. Roosevelt notes in the postscript that he is done making tours for the year, and won't make more speeches until after the election.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Anthracite Coal Strike (Pennsylvania : 1902); Trusts, Industrial; Tariff; Negotiation in business; Strikes and lockouts--Government policy; Kansas; United States. Congress; Gardner, Augustus Peabody, 1865-1918; Sargent, Frank P., 1854-1908; Quay, Matthew Stanley, 1833-1904; Hanna, Marcus Alonzo, 1837-1904; Wright, Carroll Davidson, 1840-1909; Root, Elihu, 1845-1937; Mitchell, John Inscho, 1838-1907

Date: 1902-09-27

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