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A desperate attempt to solve the Mormon question

Description:

In a four panel cartoon, four Puck cartoonists each take a panel in an effort to solve the issue of Mormonism. Clockwise from bottom left, captioned, "I imagine it must be a perfect paradise--Keppler," Joseph Keppler places himself at the center of a harem, smoking a hookah signed "J.K." and surrounded by beautiful women, one bringing a bottle of "G.H. Mumm" champagne. At top left, captioned, "I think one wife is enough--Gillam," Bernhard Gillam shows a domestic scene at his home where he, labeled "Small Income," his coattails in the clutches of his wife, attempts to avoid being struck by her with a fireplace scoop, while "My Wife's Relations" stand behind her. At top right, captioned, "How long will this destructive monster be allowed to live?--Opper," Frederick Opper is shown gesturing toward a large octopus labeled "Mormonism" that has caught in its tentacles "S.J.T., Uncle Sam, Public Opinion, Y.M.C.A., Public School System, Justice, Independent New Party, W.H.V., Field, Gould, Kelly, [a] New York Dive, [and the] Catholic Church," as well as Benjamin Butler, the U.S. Capitol, and reaching all the way to "Ireland." On the bottom right, captioned, "What is the use of Mormonism, when a man can change his wife whenever he likes?--Graetz," Friedrich Graetz stands in the foreground gesturing toward hordes of men rushing to get divorced on "Saturday. Divorce day in Chicago," and at places advertising "Divorces without publicity, Divorces procured without delay. Liberal charges, [and] Divorces obtained for $5.00."

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Polygamy; Bigamy; Harems; Divorce; Octopuses; Spouses; Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894; Opper, Frederick Burr, 1857-1937; Gillam, Bernhard, 1856-1896; Graetz, F. (Friedrich), approximately 1840-approximately 1913

Date: 1884-02-13

The pirate publisher - an international burlesque that has has the longest run on record

Description:

A man, identified as the "Pirate Publisher," stands at center with one foot on a large book labeled "Law." He is wearing 17th century court dress, a large hat with four plumes labeled "American, French, German, [and] English," and a long cape that appears to be made from the title pages of pirated works of literature; and he is carrying two moneybags. Authors from "America, Germany, France, [and] England" form a half-circle behind him, including "Mark Twain, C. D. Warner, G. W. Cable, E. C. Stedman, F. Brete Hart [i.e., Bret Harte], J. Hay, O. W. Holmes, F. R. Stockton, J. G. Whittier, T. B. Aldrich, W. D. Howells, J. R. Lowell, Heyse, Ebers, Scheffel, Zola, Sardou, A. Daudet, Jules Verne, Gilbert, Browning, Burnard, Hughes, Tennyson, [and] W. Collins." Some hold papers labeled "James Payn, Louis Carroll, Thomas Hardy, [and] R. L. Stevenson." They are accusing the man of illegally publishing their work without compensating them, while the man maintains that he has a legal right to publish their books. There is a jack-in-the-box labeled "The Hugh Conway Posthumous Producer." The jack holds a knife in one hand and a gun in the other. Includes choruses "of British Authors...French Victims...German and other Sufferers, [and] Humble American Authors."

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Copyright, International; Copyright infringement; Authors, American; Authors, English; Authors, French; Authors, German; Publishers and publishing; Jack-in-the-box

Date: 1886-02-24

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to William Potts

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt requests an increase in the administrative budget for the Civil Service Commission from William Potts. Roosevelt elaborates on how to allocate funds and shares his ideas for reorganizing the Commission.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Administrative and political divisions--Politics and government; Administrative acts; Budget--Management; Money; Civil service--Salaries, etc.

Date: 1889-05-08

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Anna Roosevelt

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt writes his sister Anna Roosevelt to say he got a nice letter from their brother Elliott, but he won't be able to visit with him because he is battling Postmaster General John Wanamaker. Hector was a dear but a terrible horse rider. Roosevelt will go with Anna the day before the wedding.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Administrative and political divisions; Letters; Horsemanship; Entertaining; Roosevelt, Elliott, 1860-1894; Wanamaker, John, 1838-1922

Date: 1892

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Anna Roosevelt

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt relates the lawyer Cleveland's advice to his sister Anna Roosevelt regarding her fiance William Sheffield Cowles' divorce problems. If Anna and Cowles were to marry now their marriage would be legal in California, but not in New York and a suit could be brought against Cowles for bigamy. It is up to them to decide if they want to take the risk.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Conflict of laws--Divorce--U.S. states; Marriage; Bigamy; Cowles, Wm. S. (William Sheffield), 1846-1923

Date: 1895-08-16

Letter from Frederick Norton Goddard to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Frederick Norton Goddard encloses two newspaper clippings for President Roosevelt's attention. He is confident in his ability to win the 20th district but is worried about the money being spent by the "Tammany Captains."

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Clippings (Books, newspapers, etc.); Press and politics; Elections; Elections--Corrupt practices; Campaign funds; Tammany Hall

Date: 1901-10-30

Letter from James Harrison Wilson to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

James Harrison Wilson believes that John Edward Addicks is buying votes and he would rather see Delaware unrepresented in the Senate than by corrupt politicians. He encloses a letter from Major J. M. Carson, a correspondent for the Philadelphia Ledger, who is an Addicks supporter.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Elections--Corrupt practices; Legislators--Corrupt practices; Bribery; Press and politics; Delaware; Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- ); Democratic Party (U.S.); United States. Congress. Senate; Addicks, John Edward Charles O’Sullivan, 1841-1919; Carson, J. M.

Date: 1901-11-01

Letter from John Edward Charles O'Sullivan Addicks to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

John Edward Addicks encloses clippings and calls President Roosevelt's attention to several sections addressing questionable Republican political machinations in Delaware. Addicks argues that the Republican Party in Delaware could collapse without Roosevelt's support. Lewis Heisler Ball is supported by the Union Republicans in Delaware.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Administrative and political divisions; Delaware; Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- ); Ball, L. Heisler (Lewis Heisler), 1861-1932

Date: 1902-05-05

Letter from W. D. Snyman to E. Reeve Merritt

Description:

W. D. Snyman defends himself from accusations by Dr. Beddy regarding embezzlement and unethical conduct during the South African War.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: South African War (1899-1902); Afrikaners; Embezzlement; Bigamy; De Wet, Christiaan Rudolf, 1854-1922

Date: 1902-08-11

Letter from Bell Merrill Draper to Anna Roosevelt Cowles

Description:

William Merrill Draper speaks out against Henry E. Davis, a candidate for Commissioner. Draper has evidence that Davis is a "recognized friend of the bucket-shops" and has legally represented their proprietors on several occasions. Draper does not believe that President Roosevelt would want such a man to be Commissioner.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Legal services; Local officials and employees--Selection and appointment; Securities fraud; Speculation; Davis, Henry E.

Date: 1902-08-12

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