Digital Library Advanced Search

SEARCH THE DIGITAL LIBRARY


32 results: Expanded View | Index View
Display: per page, sorted by
of 4 Page:

Message of the President of the United States

Description:

President Roosevelt's message to Congress at the beginning of the third session of the fifty-eighth Congress in 1904. In this message, Roosevelt discusses various aspects of the state of the union and introduces the Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine.

Resource Type: Government record

Subject: Industrial relations; Railroad accidents; Labor laws and legislation; Child labor; Railroads--Freight--Rates; Agriculture; Irrigation; Forest reserves; Game reserves; American bison--Collection and preservation; Quarantine--Law and legislation; Emigration and immigration law; Elections--Management; Monroe doctrine; Washington (D.C.); Alaska; Hawaii; Philippines; United States. Congress; United States. Bureau of Labor; United States. Bureau of Corporations; United States. Forest Service; United States. Post Office Department; National Gallery of Art (U.S.); United States. Navy; United States. Army

Date: 1904

Letter from Stewart Edward White to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Stewart Edward White writes to President Roosevelt about his visit to Washington, D.C. White thanks Roosevelt for the Whitman saddle and for contacting Chief of the United States Forest Service Gifford Pinchot. White references his upcoming marriage.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: English saddles--Fitting; Presidents--Correspondence; Marriage; California; Washington (D.C.); United States. Forest Service; Pinchot, Gifford, 1865-1946

Date: 1904-04-06

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to William A. Richards

Description:

President Roosevelt is frustrated with the bureaucracy that has been slowing down the distribution of funds to the Sierra Forest Reserve for supplies. He insists that Commissioner Richards make sure the money arrives "by the middle of May, not by the middle of November, when all chance of using it will have gone." He also asks Richards to "stir up Newhall on the cattle question," and make the cattle owners conform to regulations whether they like them or not. Finally, Roosevelt explains that he will not appoint "any supervisors who are not A1 men," and asks if local rangers can be given more power to make decisions without having to always ask officials for permission.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Bureaucracy; Forest reserves--Management; Agriculture and state; Ranching; Livestock; Employees--Appointment, qualifications, tenure, etc.; California--Sierra National Forest; United States. Forest Service

Date: 1904-04-21

Letter from Gifford Pinchot to John Campbell Greenway

Description:

Chief of the United States Forest Service Gifford Pinchot has considered the matter of President Roosevelt sending a personal representative to Minnesota. Pinchot believes it would be wiser to send someone with a knowledge of timber matters, especially lumber. Pinchot has J. B. White of Kansas City in mind. White is one of the greatest lumbermen in the country and has a wide practical knowledge of lumber.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Lumber trade; Forestry consultants; Minnesota; United States. Forest Service

Date: 1905-11-21

Letter from John Campbell Greenway to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

John Campbell Greenway encloses correspondence with the Chief of the United States Forest Service Gifford Pinchot regarding an investigation into the Cass Lake Indian Reservation, likely referring to the assessment of the land for forestry or agricultural purposes.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Political letter writing; Indian reservations; Investigations; Minnesota--Cass Lake; United States. Forest Service; Pinchot, Gifford, 1865-1946

Date: 1905-11-27

Letter from John Campbell Greenway to Gifford Pinchot

Description:

John Campbell Greenway reports to Chief of the United States Forest Service Gifford Pinchot that J. B. White has been appointed to act as the representative of President Roosevelt in the Cass Lake Indian Reservation investigation. Roosevelt also continues to collect unbiased information on the matter.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Indian reservations; Investigations; Minnesota--Cass Lake; United States. Forest Service; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1905-11-28

Letter from Gifford Pinchot to William Loeb

Description:

Gifford Pinchot explains to William Loeb what he witnessed in the Mrs. Morris incident. Pinchot reports that Laura Hull Morris was gently but firmly escorted from the White House with one guard on each side. At no point was she dragged and he does not believe the matter could have been handled any other way. Pinchot saw no "unnecessary roughness" and he believes her quiet removal was the "right and kind thing" to do. 

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Scandals; Witnesses; United States. Forest Service; White House (Washington, D.C.)

Date: 1906-01-18

Letter from Gifford Pinchot to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Gifford Pinchot, Chief of the U.S. Forest Service, writes to President Roosevelt regarding forest reserves, timber and stone law, and cultivatable land.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Land use; Timber--Law and legislation; Montana--Kalispell; United States--San Luis Valley; United States. Forest Service

Date: 1906-01-26

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Gifford Pinchot

Description:

President Theodore Roosevelt remarks on the successful work undertaken since the passing of the Reclamation Act in 1902, but cautions of "dangers and difficulties" still ahead. Roosevelt heralds the success of the Forest Service, whose policy has been shaped by the will of the people.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Arid regions; Bills, Legislative; Forests and forestry; Irrigation; Reclamation of land; United States. Forest Service; Geological Survey (U.S.). Reclamation Service

Date: 1906-08-24

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Gifford Pinchot

Description:

President Roosevelt amends a draft report on the progress in land use since the Newlands Reclamation Act was signed four years ago. More than a million acres of land have been laid out for irrigation projects. Canals and ditches have been dug, employing many. The Forest Service, the Reclamation Service, and Roosevelt's administration realize that the prosperity of citizens in those areas relies on the preservation of natural resources and the creation of forest preserves. "By keeping the public forests in the public hands our forest policy substitutes the good of the whole people for the profits of the privileged few."

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Irrigation engineering; Irrigation--U.S. states; Irrigation projects; Irrigation canals and flumes; Irrigation districts; Land speculation; Land use; Timber; Conservation of natural resources; Natural resources--U.S. states; Forest reserves; Forest policy--U.S. states; Miners; Forest fires--Prevention and control; Ranchers; United States, West; Geological Survey (U.S.). Reclamation Service; United States. Forest Service; United States. Department of the Interior; United States. Department of Agriculture

Date: 1906-08-24?

Display: per page, sorted by
of 4 Page: