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Reform without bloodshed

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt stands in front of a desk holding a stack of papers labeled "Reform Bills" for Governor Cleveland to sign.

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Social problems--Government policy; Social reformers; Civil service reform; Cleveland, Grover, 1837-1908; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1884-04-19

Latitude and longitude among reformers

Description:

Governor Roosevelt addresses political reformation among men in his article "Latitude and Longitude Among Reformers" in The Century Magazine. Roosevelt discusses what he considers to be strong and important characteristics that all reformers should have.

Resource Type: Magazine article

Subject: Americans--Politics and government; Reformers; Social reformers--Political activity

Date: 1900-06

Letter from Maria Longworth Storer to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Maria Longworth Storer congratulates President Roosevelt on the New York elections. She suggests that the Catholic Church might be more successful in inserting morality into society and politics if there were more bishops like Archbishop Ireland. Storer derides Archbishop Corrigan for his involvement with Tammany Hall and believes it to be a "matter of shame to every Catholic." She is thankful that Roosevelt is a "reformer first and a politician afterwards."

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Elections; Women social reformers; Religion and politics; New York (State); Catholic Church; Tammany Hall; Robinson, Corinne Roosevelt, 1861-1933; Ireland, John, 1838-1918; Corrigan, Michael Augustine, 1839-1902

Date: 1901-11-08

Letter from Jane Addams to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Jane Addams thanks Theodore Roosevelt for the note from Mr. Lee. She hopes to get to know Lee in the future. Addams is pleased with the "tremendous impulse" that the Progressive campaign has provided for social reform measures. She hopes to discuss the matter with Roosevelt at the meeting in New York on November 26.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Political campaigns; Social movements; Women social reformers; New York (State)--New York; Progressive Party (1912); Kellor, Frances, 1873-1952; Pinchot, Cornelia Bryce, 1881-1960

Date: 1912-11-20

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Hiram Johnson

Description:

California and Louisiana were election bright spots for the Progressive Party. The reelection of Governor Johnson was also a great success. Theodore Roosevelt attributes the general failure of the party to the public getting tired of reformers and himself. The wealthy, the educated, and the workingmen all returned to their previous parties and political machines. Roosevelt is reluctant to take further part in politics as he believes his participation will be a detriment to the causes he cares about.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Elections; Governors--Election; Party affiliation; Two-party systems; Third parties (United States politics); Social reformers--Political activity; Politicians--Public opinion; California; Louisiana; Progressive Party (1912); Penrose, Boies, 1860-1921

Date: 1914-11-06

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Philip J. Lonergan

Description:

President Roosevelt thanks Philip J. Lonergan for his letter. Roosevelt admits his disappointment and states that he has been attempting to encourage his fellow reformers.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Letters; Social problems; Public welfare; Social reformers

Date: 1914-12-29

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Gerald Morgan

Description:

President Roosevelt writes to Gerald Morgan, expressing how much he enjoyed spending the evening with Morgan's sister touring several facilities for the homeless and poor. Roosevelt expresses the misery of these individuals' situations and also bemoans how difficult it would be to rectify the situation.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Shelters for the homeless; Public welfare; Social problems; Social reformers

Date: 1914-12-31

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Kermit Roosevelt

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt was disappointed that Charles Scribner's Sons changed the name of his book on the Roosevelt-Rondon Scientific Expedition from A Hunter-Naturalist in the Brazilian Wilderness to Through the Brazilian Wilderness. However, he was distracted by Progressive Party matters. Roosevelt is no longer expected to lead the Progressive Party and it is unlikely to make "another fight as a national party." He has spent his life attempting to balance the ideal and the practical; with considerable success. In politics, Roosevelt was able to use the reformers without letting them grow "wild-eyed" and also maintain a relationship with machine politicians. However, after returning from the African safari the situation had changed. Reformers were nearing "lunacy" and machine politics had joined with William H. Taft. It proved impossible to rejoin these factions and Roosevelt had to side with the reformers. He thinks it might have been a mistake to reenter politics after the presidency and feels out of touch with the American people. The Barnes libel suit will take place in April and Roosevelt feels he will prove his case.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Roosevelt-Rondon Scientific Expedition; Books and reading; Titles of books; Political leadership; Political leadership--Philosophy; Third parties (United States politics); Party affiliation; Political parties--Management; Social reformers--Political activity; Ex-presidents; Libel and slander; Trials (Libel); Progressive Party (1912); Charles Scribner's Sons; Roosevelt, Edith Kermit Carow, 1861-1948; Roosevelt, Belle, 1892-1968; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1887-1944; Taft, William H. (William Howard), 1857-1930; Pinchot, Gifford, 1865-1946; Barnes, William, 1866-1930; Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924; Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925; Penrose, Boies, 1860-1921

Date: 1915-01-27

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