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Concerning public order

Description:

Panamanian president Tomás Arias announces the separation of Panama from Colombia and the creation of their own independent nation. The "pacific" nature of the people and the open, honest government both contributed to this end result. There is hope that the Panama Canal and Panama's relationship with the United States will bring happiness and abundance to the nation, still reeling from the "demoralization caused by the last war." The Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty signed November 2 will help ensure this new time of peace and rebuilding. Self governance must be done with the good of the entire community in mind and a unity of purpose, as the intolerance of old will lead to ruin. The report writer recounts internal disagreements around the last election and the detention of Colombian, Cuban, Mexican, and Nicaraguan officials who were working against this new unity. 

Resource Type: Report

Subject: Revolution (Panama : 1903); National characteristics, Panamanian; Constitutions--Republics; International relations--Treaties; Militia movements; Pacifism; Community--Political aspects; Interim governments; Panama; Panama--Panama Canal; Panama--Colon Free Zone; Colombia; Panama--Panama; United States; Bunau-Varilla, Philippe, 1859-1940; Davis, George W. (George Whitefield), 1839-1918; Magoon, Charles Edward, 1861-1920; Taft, William H. (William Howard), 1857-1930; Root, Elihu, 1845-1937; Hay, John, 1838-1905

Date: 1906-11-23

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Albert Apponyi

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt forwarded Albert Apponyi's article to The Outlook but cannot guarantee its publication. He has felt out of sympathy with the pacifist movement and agrees with Apponyi that not all questions are suitable for arbitration or international inquiry. Roosevelt is "inexpressibly saddened" by the war in Europe and states that both sides have sincere convictions. He has no doubt that Belgium has been wronged, which must be addressed if "treaties are ever to amount to anything." Roosevelt has many European friends and laments what is happening.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: World War (1914-1918); Pacifism; Arbitration, International; War; War--Moral and ethical aspects; War crimes; International relations--Treaties; Belgium

Date: 1914-09-17

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to William Crozier

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt appreciates General Crozier's article in the North American Review. He agrees that nations can arbitrate all matters after reaching "a certain static position in relation to one another," such as between the United States and Canada. However, pacifists don't face real world facts and harm the country by leading to "tom-fool positions." Roosevelt agrees with Crozier regarding Mexico but is not yet ready to state his views. He was interested in General Brugere's letter and wishes he could serve with him in the war. However, Roosevelt isn't willing to fight unless he is leading American troops and believes he could raise a division similar to the Rough Riders.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: World War (1914-1918); Arbitration, International; Pacifists; Pacifism--Moral and ethical aspects; Military service, Voluntary; Canada; Mexico; Belgium; United States. Army. Volunteer Cavalry, 1st; Brugère, Henri Joseph, 1841-1918

Date: 1914-12-11

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Cecil Spring Rice

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt reviews American public opinion towards the war, which is generally favorable towards the allies. However, German Americans are "furiously on the side of Germany" and most politicians have more to fear from an interested minority than a "tepid" majority." Roosevelt believes that the strong German American feeling derives from the fact that American contraband trade is significantly more valuable to the allies. He recommends that Great Britain be lenient on the contraband trade with Germany as a strict policy will damage American merchants and turn public opinion in favor of Germany. Roosevelt doesn't want Great Britain to insist on rights that will create hostility, expand its view on belligerent rights to extremes, or be too strict with contraband.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: World War (1914-1918); International relations--Public opinion; War--Public opinion; German Americans--Political activity; Pacifism; Contraband of war; Neutral trade with belligerents; International trade--Political aspects; Neutrality; Great Britain; Germany; Belgium; Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924; Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925

Date: 1915-01-05

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Arthur Hamilton Lee

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt is envious of Lieutenant Colonel Lee as he has a "chance to do a piece of duty supremely worth doing." Roosevelt wrote a short book on the war entitled America and the World War and hasn't "minced matters." He would like Lee to look at the book. Roosevelt disapproves of President Wilson, Secretary of State Bryan, and the peace advocates. In a postscript, Roosevelt has decided to send Lee the letters he wrote to Edward Grey and Ambassador Cecil Spring Rice. American public opinion is swinging back towards the allies. It has been "soul-trying" to listen to pacifist Englishmen and pro-German Americans, such as Nicholas Murray Butler. Roosevelt continues to be disgusted by the policies of the Wilson administration and their efforts to take political advantage of the war.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: World War (1914-1918); Military service, Voluntary; Books and reading; War--Political aspects; War and society; War--Public opinion; Military policy; Military readiness; Pacifism; Pacifists--Political activity; Great Britain; Germany; Belgium; Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924; Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925; Grey of Fallodon, Edward Grey, Viscount, 1862-1933; Spring Rice, Cecil, Sir, 1859-1918; Butler, Nicholas Murray, 1862-1947

Date: 1915-01-22

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Arthur Deerin Call

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt argues that war can be carried out for the "cause of Peace and Righteousness." Praising peace in the abstract is useless if you are not willing to "stand up effectively for peace." Roosevelt believes in a peace of justice and has "brought Peace and served Peace in many ways."

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: World War (1914-1918); War--Moral and ethical aspects; Peace--Moral and ethical aspects; International relations; Pacifism; Contracts (International law); Peace--Societies, etc.; Military readiness; Panama--Panama Canal; Cuba; Philippines; Belgium; Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924; Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925

Date: 1915-02-04

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Juliet Barrett Rublee

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt advises against joining the peace organization and describes their platform of principles as "silly and base." He compares the current peace advocates to the Copperheads of the American Civil War. Roosevelt views the peace movement as futile. Roosevelt is also distressed that the peace advocates make no mention of the wrongs committed against Belgium. He wants the United States to stop these wrongs. Roosevelt would like everyone to refuse to have anything to do with such a "foolish and noxious" movement.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: World War (1914-1918); American Civil War (1861-1865); Peace movements--Societies, etc.; Peace--Moral and ethical aspects; War--Moral and ethical aspects; International relations--Moral and ethical aspects; Peace movements; Peace movements--Citizen participation; Peace movements--Political aspects; Pacifism; Copperhead movement; Belgium

Date: 1915-02-09

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Cecil Spring Rice

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt is humiliated by the Wilson administration and angered by the attitude of "professional German Americans." However, there are many German Americans that don't sympathize with Germany. Americans don't understand foreign affairs and many will simply follow where the president leads. Roosevelt agrees that each nation must look out for itself but suggests that in twenty-five years Great Britain could be allying with Germany against Russia.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: World War (1914-1918); War; International relations; Alliances; German Americans--Ethnic identity; German Americans--Political activity; Allegiance; Political leadership; Pacifists--Political activity; Pacifism; Great Britain; Germany; Russia; Belgium; Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924

Date: 1915-02-09

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Alfred Thayer Mahan

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt compliments Major Alfred Thayer Mahan on his recent article and discusses the efforts of "professional pacifists."

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: World War (1914-1918); Publishers and publishing; Pacifism

Date: 1915-02-26

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Archibald B. Roosevelt

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt thinks the poem was great and agrees with its sentiment. He wishes Jane Addams's admirers might send it to her, otherwise the poem will just have to be for the enjoyment of Archibald B. Roosevelt's "warlike" family. Roosevelt encourages Archie to read the next issue of the Metropolitan where he will see something about his pacifistic and German-American father.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Poetry; Pacifism; Fathers and sons; Joking relationships; Addams, Jane, 1860-1935

Date: 1915-03-13

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