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Theodore Roosevelt and the Harvard Advocate staff

Description:

Group portrait of thirteen members of the Harvard Advocate staff, including Theodore Roosevelt, standing in back row on the right.

Resource Type: Photograph

Subject: College student newspapers and periodicals; Harvard College (1780- ); Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1880

The return of the "prodigal father" at the "Puck" office - drawn by himself

Description:

Print shows Joseph F. Keppler returning to the "PUCK Office" after a vacation in Europe, laden with a string of "Frankfurt" sausages, "Paris" wine, "Neuchâtel" cheese from "Austria", an umbrella labeled "London", and a large tankard labeled "Munich." Puck rushes to greet him, and other staff crowd the office. On the left is the "Artists Dep[artment]" with "Gillam Hogarth, Opper Raphael, Gräetz Apelles, [and] Zim" emerging to welcome Keppler home. There is a cabinet at center, in the background, with bust models of William H. Vanderbilt, Benjamin F. Butler, George M. Robeson, James G. Blaine, Samuel J. Tilden, Carl Schurz, Ulysses S. Grant, Chester A. Arthur, James G. Bennett, and on a statue is a bust of Roscoe Conkling. Next to the "Editorial Department", on the right, are books labeled "Harvey's Meditations Among the Tombs, Congressional Record, Paley's Natural Theology, Poetical Works of G.W. Childs, [and] London Punch".

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Homecoming; Journalism

Date: 1883-10-10

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to M.A. De Wolfe Howe

Description:

Civil Service Commissioner Roosevelt regrets that he is unable to write the article requested by M A. De Wolfe Howe, since he is currently at work on another project.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Feature writing; Journalism--Authorship

Date: 1889-07-10

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to M.A. De Wolfe Howe

Description:

Civil Service Commissioner Roosevelt is sorry that his first letter to M. A. De Wolfe Howe has gone missing, but is unable to write for the magazine at this time due to his other writing projects.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Feature writing; Journalism--Authorship

Date: 1889-07-21

The fin de si├Ęcle newspaper proprietor

Description:

A newspaper owner, possibly Joseph Pulitzer, sits in a chair in his office next to an open safe where "Profits" are spilling out onto the floor. Outside this scene are many newspaper reporters for the "Daily Splurge" rushing to the office to toss their stories onto the printing press, including "A Week as a Tramp!! Wild and Exciting Experiences of a Daily Splurge Reporter," "A Reporter of the Daily Splurge Spends a Thrilling Week in an Asylum!" "An Organ Grinder's Life," "Life in Sing Sing - a Splurge Reporter in Disguise," "Divorce Court Details," "Private Scandal," "A Night Around Town" by a woman reporter "in Men's Attire," life on the streets "As a Flower Girl," "Thrilling Exposé," "How beggars are treated on 5th Ave. by Fanny Fake," and "High Spiced Sensation." A notice hanging on the wall of the office states, "The Motto of the Daily Splurge - Morality and a High Sense of Duty." Caption: He combines high-sounding professions with high-spiced sensations, and reaps a golden profit thereby.

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Newspapers; Reporters and reporting; Sensationalism in journalism; Ethics; Avarice; Printing presses; Pulitzer, Joseph, 1847-1911

Date: 1894-03-07

Bad for business

Description:

A band of street musicians is comprised of yellow journalism newspaper editors/publishers. Two men are playing "The War Wave" on horns labeled Daily Sensation (Joseph Pulitzer) and Morning Exciter (possibly James Gordon Bennett, Jr.). A man (possibly Charles A. Dana) is playing a tune labeled "Rumblings of War" on a bass drum labeled Daily Brawler. Two other men are playing tunes labeled "War Talk" and "War News." A man with one hand over his right ear is standing at the entrance to a building labeled "Business Interests" and "Commerce and Manufactures"; with his left hand he gestures toward the musicians to stop or move on.

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Street musicians; Newspaper editors; Communication; Sensationalism in journalism; War and society; Pulitzer, Joseph, 1847-1911; Bennett, James Gordon, 1841-1918; Dana, Charles A. (Charles Anderson), 1819-1897

Date: 1896-03-25

The "new journalism" beats him

Description:

A bespectacled man wearing a top hat and overcoat stands in the street, holding a book titled "Old Sleuth the Detective." Near him, young children are reading the newspapers labeled "Daily Scandal Monger," "Morning Cyclone of Crime," "Daily Rot, Daily Scooper, [and] Morning Scavenger." Behind are newsstands labeled "All the Sensation Papers" and "Don't Fail to Buy the Sunday Slop Bucket," with headlines such as "How to Poison a Whole City," "Murder," and "Crime." Caption: Dime Novel Writer--And they used to say that my books were bad for young peoples' morals!

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Dime novels; Newspapers; City and town life; Children; Reading; Sensationalism in journalism

Date: 1897-03-17

Roosevelt says it's infamous

Description:

In an article published in The Sun, Assistant Secretary of the Navy Roosevelt refutes an interview printed in The New York Journal, stating that it was an invention from beginning to end. Roosevelt reports that he refused the interview, despite the persistence of the reporter, because he has never "given a certificate of character to the Journal" and that nothing "would be of less consequence" than the reporter changing his opinion of Roosevelt.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Press and politics; Interviews; Journalistic ethics; American newspapers

Date: 1898-03-20

Honor to McKinley!

Description:

Joseph Pulitzer and a monkey, possibly meant to represent William R. Hearst, are pictured as cyclones producing trails of yellow journalism newspapers with outrageous headlines, calling for a declaration of war; while President McKinley calmly reads a paper that states "The People of the United States have full confidence in your Patriotism, Integrity, & Bravery. They know you will act justly and wisely: decent press."

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Spanish-American War (1898); Newspaper publishing; Journalism; McKinley, William, 1843-1901; Pulitzer, Joseph, 1847-1911; Hearst, William Randolph, 1863-1951

Date: 1898-03-23

An Easter sermon

Description:

President McKinley stops the hand of a man wearing buccaneer clothing and holding a large sword labeled "Yellow Journalism" and a trumpet labeled "War." On the right is a goose wearing a medal labeled "Business Revival" and a large golden egg labeled "Prosperity 1898." Caption: Yellow journalism is more dangerous to our peace, prosperity and national honor than all the enemies outside our gates.

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Journalism; Peace; Geese; Eggs; McKinley, William, 1843-1901

Date: 1898-04-13

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