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Quote of the Day

Theodore Roosevelt was a very effective writer and speaker, and he is eminently quotable. For each of the quotes below, the Theodore Roosevelt Center has provided a brief explanation of the setting or the context in which TR made the statement.

The TR Quote of the Day App, available in the Mac App Store or Android Market for your iOS and Android devices, also includes a TR Quiz to test your knowledge about our 26th president.

Featured Quote for January 18, 2017:

You met a great need, that vanished because of your success. You have left us many memories, to be prized forevermore. You have taught us many lessons; and none more important than the lesson of brotherhood.
Draft of a speech with handwritten corrections. Vice President Roosevelt praises Vermont and its people for the services they rendered during the American Civil War. He views the war as bringing together a diverse range of people to fight for a "lofty ideal." At the war's conclusion, the soldiers returned to civilian life with a sense of duty well done and a feeling of community interest that would eventually extend even to "the gallant men who wore the grey." Roosevelt holds the Civil War veterans up as a model to follow and shows how recent American conflicts have taught similar lessons in a lesser way.

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Quotes:

of 196 Page: 1955 articles:
January 17, 2017
It is difficult to express the full measure of obligation under which this country is to the men who from ’61 to ’65 took up the most terrible and vitally necessary task which has ever fallen to the lot of any generation of men in the western hemisphere. Other men have rendered great service to the country, but the service you rendered was not merely great—it was incalculable.
Draft of a speech with handwritten corrections. Vice President Roosevelt praises Vermont and its people for the services they rendered during the American Civil War. He views the war as bringing together a diverse range of people to fight for a "lofty ideal." At the war's conclusion, the soldiers returned to civilian life with a sense of duty well done and a feeling of community interest that would eventually extend even to "the gallant men who wore the grey." Roosevelt holds the Civil War veterans up as a model to follow and shows how recent American conflicts have taught similar lessons in a lesser way.

View Document of Origin

January 16, 2017
The fact that eighteen cattle owners yelled on being required to be decent and conform to regulations is of no early consequences. Let them yell and make them conform to the regulations.
President Roosevelt is frustrated with the bureaucracy that has been slowing down the distribution of funds to the Sierra Forest Reserve for supplies. He insists that Commissioner Richards make sure the money arrives "by the middle of May, not by the middle of November, when all chance of using it will have gone." He also asks Richards to "stir up Newhall on the cattle question," and make the cattle owners conform to regulations whether they like them or not. Finally, Roosevelt explains that he will not appoint "any supervisors who are not A1 men," and asks if local rangers can be given more power to make decisions without having to always ask officials for permission.

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January 15, 2017
If there is any human being in this country with whom I do not sympathize, it is the type of office individual who has a roll of red tape in place of a gizzard.
President Roosevelt is frustrated with the bureaucracy that has been slowing down the distribution of funds to the Sierra Forest Reserve for supplies. He insists that Commissioner Richards make sure the money arrives "by the middle of May, not by the middle of November, when all chance of using it will have gone." He also asks Richards to "stir up Newhall on the cattle question," and make the cattle owners conform to regulations whether they like them or not. Finally, Roosevelt explains that he will not appoint "any supervisors who are not A1 men," and asks if local rangers can be given more power to make decisions without having to always ask officials for permission.

View Document of Origin

January 14, 2017
Save in exceptional cases the prizes worth having in life must be paid for, and the life worth living must be a life of work for a worthy end, and ordinarily of work more for others than for one’s self.
The third and final draft of President Roosevelt's speech to the National Congress of Mothers, which was delivered on March 13, 1905, and addressed the role of mothers and fathers in child rearing. This draft was cut into sections by the printer and contains notes made by Roosevelt.

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January 13, 2017
No man and no woman really worthy of the name can care for the life spent solely or chiefly in the avoidance of risk and trouble and labor.
The third and final draft of President Roosevelt's speech to the National Congress of Mothers, which was delivered on March 13, 1905, and addressed the role of mothers and fathers in child rearing. This draft was cut into sections by the printer and contains notes made by Roosevelt.

View Document of Origin

January 12, 2017
Teach boys and girls alike that they are not to look forward to lives spent in avoiding difficulties but to lives spent in overcoming difficulties. Teach them that work, for themselves and also for others, is not a curse but a blessing; see to make them happy, to make them enjoy life, but see also to make them face life with the steadfast resolution to wrest success from labor and adversity, and to do their whole duty before God and to man.
The third and final draft of President Roosevelt's speech to the National Congress of Mothers, which was delivered on March 13, 1905, and addressed the role of mothers and fathers in child rearing. This draft was cut into sections by the printer and contains notes made by Roosevelt.

View Document of Origin

January 11, 2017
The birth pangs make all men the debtors of women.
The third and final draft of President Roosevelt's speech to the National Congress of Mothers, which was delivered on March 13, 1905, and addressed the role of mothers and fathers in child rearing. This draft was cut into sections by the printer and contains notes made by Roosevelt.

View Document of Origin

January 10, 2017
No ordinary work done by a man is either as hard or as responsible as the work of a woman who is bringing up a family of small children; for upon her time and strength demands are made not only every hour of the day but often every hour of the night.
The third and final draft of President Roosevelt's speech to the National Congress of Mothers, which was delivered on March 13, 1905, and addressed the role of mothers and fathers in child rearing. This draft was cut into sections by the printer and contains notes made by Roosevelt.

View Document of Origin

January 9, 2017
In the last analysis the welfare of the state depends absolutely upon whether or not the average family, the average man and woman and their children represent the kind of citizenship fit for the foundation of a great nation; and if we fail to appreciate this we fail to appreciate the root morality upon which all healthy civilization is based.
The third and final draft of President Roosevelt's speech to the National Congress of Mothers, which was delivered on March 13, 1905, and addressed the role of mothers and fathers in child rearing. This draft was cut into sections by the printer and contains notes made by Roosevelt.

View Document of Origin

January 7, 2017
No matter what that occupation may be, as long as there is a real home and as long as those who make up that home do their duty to one another, to their neighbors and to the state, it is of minor consequence whether the man’s trade is plied in the country or the city, whether it calls for the work of the hands or for the work of the head.
The third and final draft of President Roosevelt's speech to the National Congress of Mothers, which was delivered on March 13, 1905, and addressed the role of mothers and fathers in child rearing. This draft was cut into sections by the printer and contains notes made by Roosevelt.

View Document of Origin

of 196 Page: 1955 articles: