Quote of the Day

Theodore Roosevelt was a very effective writer and speaker, and he is eminently quotable. For each of the quotes below, the Theodore Roosevelt Center has provided a brief explanation of the setting or the context in which TR made the statement.

The TR Quote of the Day App, available in the Mac App Store or Android Market for your iOS and Android devices, also includes a TR Quiz to test your knowledge about our 26th president.

Featured Quote for February:

My fellow citizens, men and women of Colorado, the men of the great war taught us by their lives another lesson besides what they taught us in battle and campaign - - they taught us the lesson which we need to apply now in time of peace, at this stage of our industrial development at the outset of the twentieth century, the essential lesson of brotherhood and of treating each man on his merits as a man.

President Roosevelt addresses the citizens of Pueblo, thanking them for their greeting. He also speaks of the lessons learned from the men of the Civil War about brotherhood.

View Document of Origin

Quotes:

of 161 Page: 1609 articles:
February 2016

The best product of any region is the product of its citizenship.

President Roosevelt addresses the citizens of Albuquerque. He is impressed by the irrigation and by the efforts of the New Mexico territory to become a state. Roosevelt speaks of the importance of educating the children into good citizens. He also defines what it truly means to be a man.

View Document of Origin

February 2016

We have but little room among our people for the timid, the irresolute and the idle; and it is no less true that there is scant room in the world at large for the nation with mighty thews that dares not to be great.

This discussion about pioneers comes from a speech Vice President Theodore Roosevelt gave at the Minnesota State Fair in Minneapolis, on Sept. 2nd, 1901. In the speech Roosevelt advocates for a vigorous policy at home and abroad of seeking justice and battling “barbarism” exemplified by the proverb, “Speak softly and carry a big stick—you will go far.”

View Document of Origin

February 2016

Our country has been populated by pioneers; and therefore it has in it more energy, more enterprise, more expansive power than any other in the wide world.

This discussion about pioneers comes from a speech Vice President Theodore Roosevelt gave at the Minnesota State Fair in Minneapolis, on Sept. 2nd, 1901. In the speech Roosevelt advocates for a vigorous policy at home and abroad of seeking justice and battling “barbarism” exemplified by the proverb, “Speak softly and carry a big stick—you will go far.”

View Document of Origin

February 2016

It is a good thing to have a sound body, it is a better thing to have a sound mind; but what we need is that which is great than body or mind –character.

A speech given to a group of children in Sioux Falls, SD.

Address of President Roosevelt to the school children at Sioux Falls, S. D., April 6, 1903. April 4, 1903 Theodore Roosevelt Papers. Library of Congress Manuscript Division. http://www.theodorerooseveltcenter.org/Research/Digital-Library/Record.aspx?libID=o289688. Theodore Roosevelt Digital Library. Dickinson State University.

View Document of Origin

February 2016

The man who seeks to inspire one set of Americans to hate another because of difference of creed, because of difference of locality, difference of occupation, or of wealth, is a curse to the republic.

President Roosevelt’s remarks about citizenship and respect for others during a speech in Joliet, Illinois. Remarks of President Roosevelt at Joliet, Illinois, June 3, 1903. June 3, 1903 Theodore Roosevelt Papers. Library of Congress Manuscript Division.

View Document of Origin

February 2016

We in this country have been very fortunate. Thanks to the teaching and the practice of the men whom we most revere as leaders, of the men like Washington and Lincoln, we have hitherto escaped the twin guilt, of despotism and mob rule, and we have never been in any danger from the worst forms of religious bitterness.

An excerpt from the article The thraldom of names written by Theodore Roosevelt cautioning the public to look beyond political rhetoric and to be conscious of how words are used.

View Document of Origin

January 2016

No people on earth have more cause to be thankful than ours, and this is said reverently, in no spirit of boastfulness in our own strength, but with gratitude to the Giver of Good who has blessed us with the conditions which have enabled us to achieve so large a measure of well-being and happiness.

During a grand celebration and in the company of his most esteemed friends, President Roosevelt opens his inaugural address with these words, 1905.

View Document of Origin

January 2016

The distinguishing feature of our American governmental system is the freedom of the individual; it is quite as important to prevent his being oppressed by many men as it is to save him from the tyranny of one.

In 1886, Theodore Roosevelt published his biography of Thomas Hart Benton, the Democratic Senator from Missouri who advocated for manifest destiny and authored the Homestead Acts that opened the U.S. West to Anglo settlement. Benton was strongly individualistic and thus made incontrovertible enemies in his political career. Roosevelt could certainly empathize with Benton on this point.

January 2016

I want to include everybody, so as to rub up their memories about the existence of a man named Theodore Roosevelt, who is going to bring a pretty Boston wife back to New York next winter.

As Theodore Roosevelt plans to marry Alice Lee, he writes a letter to his mother discussing the guest list for the wedding. He wants to send invitations to everyone he knows “or ought to know.”

View Document of Origin

January 2016

The wise custom which limits the President to two terms regards the substance and not the form. Under no circumstances will I be a candidate for or accept another nomination.

Roosevelt uttered these fateful words on the night he was elected to presidency in his own right in November 1904. The vow was his greatest political mistake. He entered the presidency as the youngest ever to hold the office, and left at the height of his intellectual and political powers. It was his fifth cousin Franklin Roosevelt who finally broke the precedent of two terms only for presidents.

of 161 Page: 1609 articles: