2010 Theodore Roosevelt Symposium

Theodore Roosevelt: The President in the Arena

September 16-18, 2010

Though he was an “accidental president,” coming into office on the assassination of William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt was nevertheless a president of pivotal importance to our understanding of the transition from the 19th to the 20th century and our understanding of the triumph of executive power in the 20th century. Thanks to his status as a war hero, his national reputation as a cowboy and rancher, and the immense colorfulness and purposefulness of his character, Roosevelt helped to transform the presidency and reset the balance of the separation of powers in the U.S. Constitution. This symposium examined Theodore Roosevelt's actions as president and his impact on the post.

View the 2010 Theodore Roosevelt Symposium brochure (PDF)

Peri Arnold

Author of Remaking the Presidency: Roosevelt, Taft and Wilson and Making the Managerial Presidency, Peri E. Arnold studies and teaches American politics and the presidency at the University of Notre Dame, where he is professor of political science. Arnold’s research has focused on the presidents of the early 20th century, particularly Theodore Roosevelt’s novel leadership.

Julie Greene

A historian of U.S. labor and working-class history, political history, and U.S.-Latin American relations, Julie Greene is the author of The Canal Builders: Making America’s Empire at the Panama Canal, which was awarded the 2009 James A. Rawley Prize for the best book on the history of race relations by the Organization of American Historians. Greene is a professor of history at the University of Maryland.

David Godshalk

Author of Veiled Visions: The 1906 Atlanta Race Riot and the Reshaping of American Race Relations, David F. Godshalk is professor of history at Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania. The recipient of numerous teaching and service awards, he is currently completing a book on the national significance of the vibrant African American intellectual community that emerged in Atlanta during the Progressive Era.

Amy Verone

Chief of Cultural Resources at Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, the Roosevelt family home in Oyster Bay, New York, Amy Verone previously worked at the National Archives, the National Museum of American Art, the National Museum of American History, and Canterbury Shaker Village.

Peri Arnold, keynote speaker at the 2010 Theodore Roosevelt Symposium, delivers his lecture "A Novel President: TR in the Progressive Arena" on September 16, 2010.

Julie Greene, delivers her lecture "The Work You Have Done Here WIll Remain for the Ages: Theodore Roosevelt and America's New Empire" on September 17, 2010

Panel discussion, TR in the International Arena. A panel of experts discuss Theodore Roosevelt's international agenda and events. The panel is moderated by Clay S. Jenkinson and includes professors Frank Varney and David Meier with Julie Greene.

Dr. David Godshalk delivers his lecture "Theodore Roosevelt and Race" on September 17, 2010

Panel discussion, TR in the Domestic Arena. A panel of experts discuss Theodore Roosevelt's domestic agenda and events. The panel is moderated by Clay S. Jenkinson and includes professors Gary Cummisk and Steven Doherty with Amy Verone from Sagmore Hill National Historic Site.

Clay S. Jenkinson, moderator, delivers his lecture "Roosevelt's 1903 Campaign and Conservation Journey in the American West" on September 17, 2010.

Music in the White House, a presentation of Music in the White House 1901-1909. Program put together by Dr. Tim Justus.

Clay S. Jenkinson, moderator, delivers his lecture "Predicting Roosevelt's Presidency" on September 18, 2010 in Medora, North Dakota.

Valerie Naylor and Clay Jenkinson, moderator of the symposium, discuss the origins of Mount Rushmore.

Panel discussion, Assessing Roosevelt's Presidency. A panel discusses the main points of the symposium. The panel is moderated by Clay S. Jenkinson and includes Peri Arnold, Julie Greene, David Godshalk, and Amy Verone.