Blog

Knitting with Quentin

Feb 20, 2013

In 1932, Edith Roosevelt received a letter in which was contained an amusing anecdote regarding her son Quentin. The author of the letter, Betty Kilral, attended the Girls’ Latin School in Boston, and had heard this story from her teacher.

Letter from Betty Kilral to Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt

Letter from Betty Kilral to Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt, July 18, 1932. From the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site collection.

The story transcribed below evidently occurred on the train from New Hampshire to Boston:

“It was before the War, and the woman was complacently seated knitting socks. Suddenly a young man confronted her and asked if she would please teach him to knit before the train reached Boston. The knitting lessons began immediately and after the first few rows were completed, the young man, with his knitting returned to his friends. By the time the train reached Boston the boy was quite proficient with the needles.”

Letter from Betty Kilral to Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt

Letter from Betty Kilral to Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt, July 18, 1932. From the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site collection.

Thus it was that Quentin Roosevelt learned to knit. The letter further clarifies the reason for his sudden desire to take up knitting. It seems that Quentin had wagered a friend that he could learn to knit before the train reached Boston. While the letter does not specify Quentin’s reward for winning this wager, his determination to succeed is quite apparent.

Posted by Keri Youngstrand on Feb 20, 2013 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Add A Comment

*
Required Fields
*
 
*