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Dare to Compete Against TR in Writing

Feb 09, 2017

I’m fascinated by books and writing. TR’s correspondence offers a glimpse into publication history and who gets to tell a story in print.

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Posted by Pamela Pierce on Feb 09, 2017 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

El Morro National Monument: Notes from the National Park Vagabond

Jan 27, 2017

El Morro National Monument, established on December 8, 1906, may be the second national monument proclaimed by Theodore Roosevelt after the passage of the Antiquities Act.  (Devils Tower in Wyoming was the first.)  TR established three monuments that day - Petrified Forest, Montezuma Castle, and El Morro.  Nobody knows which he proclaimed first, but the last two superintendents of El Morro have assured me, with a wink, that El Morro must have been the first one of the day.

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Posted by Valerie Naylor on Jan 27, 2017 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

TR and the American Family

Dec 08, 2016

I wonder what TR would say about the state of the American family – and by extension, the state of the country itself – in 2016?

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Posted by Cali Neuberger on Dec 08, 2016 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Theodore Roosevelt's Wild Ride to the Presidency: Part 2

Nov 22, 2016

On September 13, news that President McKinley was failing reached Vice President Roosevelt as he was coming down from the mountain at Lake Tear-of-the-Clouds. News had already taken some time to reach him, but Roosevelt calmly continued to eat his dinner. He had no intention of returning to Buffalo unless he was really needed. Upon receiving another message, he made plans to leave the next day. The last message, received at 10 p.m., indicated that the president was dying, and thus Roosevelt began his famous dash through the night to Buffalo.

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Posted by Ashley Zengerski on Nov 22, 2016 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Theodore Roosevelt's Wild Ride to the Presidency: Part 1

Nov 15, 2016

In 1901, a series of events in Buffalo unfolded that pushed Vice President Theodore Roosevelt into the presidency. This two-part blog post will illustrate the tumultuous turn of events that began at the Pan-American Exposition.

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Posted by Ashley Zengerski on Nov 15, 2016 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Notes from the National Park Vagabond: Mesa Verde National Park

Oct 28, 2016

Mesa Verde was the first national park set aside primarily for its cultural resources. The previous nine national parks were created for their outstanding scenery or natural resources. Today, there are numerous national parks and monuments set aside for their contributions to our cultural heritage.

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Posted by Valerie Naylor on Oct 28, 2016 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Notes from the National Park Vagabond: Crater Lake National Park

Sep 07, 2016

Crater Lake National Park was established on May 22, 1902. It includes the deepest lake in North America (approximately 1943 feet), and perhaps the cleanest large body of water in the world. The deep blue of the lake is almost unbelievable. If you haven’t seen it in person, I hope you will plan a trip soon.

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Posted by Valerie Naylor on Sep 07, 2016 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Notes from the National Park Vagabond: Devils Tower and Jewel Cave National Monuments

Aug 04, 2016

Because many parks do not have adequate museum storage facilities or a dedicated curator, collections from several parks are often stored at central offices or multi-park repositories. Consolidation can ensure that the collections have the proper space and environmental controls, and they can often be tended by one curator.

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Posted by Valerie Naylor on Aug 04, 2016 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Tremendous Respect and Admiration

Jul 28, 2016

Occasionally, there were views or policies which raised my 21st Century eyebrows, but the letter which stayed with me long after I first read it; the letter which I mention to anyone who asks about my work this summer, is one that fills me with tremendous respect and admiration for America’s 26th President.

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Posted by Catherine Kerner on Jul 28, 2016 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

A Woman with Agency: The First White House Social Secretary

Jul 20, 2016

While cataloging correspondence from the Library of Congress Manuscripts Division, I came across the typewritten words of a woman who held the position of “Social Secretary” to the White House. The creation date was 1902. The history of women in the White House suddenly fascinated me, as a major part of social history at the turn of the 20th century. This is not a time period that I would historically associate with female agency in cosmopolitan American society, much less political inclusion, so I was very curious to know more about her. How did she rise to this position? What did she do? Does the White House still have a Social Secretary position? 

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Posted by Emily Perkins on Jul 20, 2016 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post
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