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Serious Cartooning: The Survival of the Fittest

Feb 28, 2014

“The Survival of the Fittest,” printed in Puck magazine, represents the passage of the Gold Standard Act, referred to on the gold man’s sword as the “Sound Money Law of 1900.” The cartoon’s publication and President McKinley’s signing of the act both occurred on March 14, 1900.

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Posted by Grant Carlson on Feb 28, 2014 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

In His Own Words: African American Suffrage

Feb 25, 2014

February is Black History month, and we would like to feature some items from our collections that are of relevance to black history. In today's blog Theodore Roosevelt explains his perceptions regarding the African American vote.

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Posted by Keri Youngstrand on Feb 25, 2014 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Father of the Modern Olympic Games

Feb 20, 2014

Pierre de Coubertin, the father of the modern Olympic Games, was born into a French aristocratic family on January 1, 1863.

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Posted by Grant Carlson on Feb 20, 2014 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Roosevelt's Contemporaries: Robert Bacon

Feb 13, 2014

Continuing our blog series, "Roosevelt's Contemporaries," this post features Robert Bacon, who was a close friend and Harvard classmate of Theodore Roosevelt. Bacon joined the Roosevelt administration in 1905 as Assistant Secretary of State.

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Posted by Grant Carlson on Feb 13, 2014 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Serious Cartooning: Hint from History

Feb 07, 2014

"A Hint From History," published in Puck magazine on June 27, 1900, is a cautionary cartoon directed at Imperial Germany, which is represented by a uniformed and armed Emperor William II, whose reign lasted from 1888-1918.

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Posted by Grant Carlson on Feb 07, 2014 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

TR and the Norwegian Royal Family

Feb 04, 2014

While on his European tour in 1910, Theodore Roosevelt enjoyed the time he spent in Norway as he described in a letter to George Otto Trevelyan more than a year after the experience.

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Posted by Keri Youngstrand on Feb 04, 2014 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post