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A Study of Roosevelt's...Nose?

May 31, 2011

We just received our first shipment of scrapbooks from the Theodore Roosevelt Collection at Harvard University and while for the most part they are full of newspaper articles and magazine cartoons, when I stumbled across this particular “article,” I knew I had to share it on the blog. According to The New York World in April of 1884, Roosevelt’s nose shows a benevolent nature and an investigative mind. The study of Physiognomy (the study of a person’s character from their outward appearance) was quite common in the late 19th and early 20th centuries which would explain why a study like this was published in the newspaper. Still, who knew we could learn so much from a person’s nose?!

The Young Reformer. R951.R67t, Volume 5. Houghton Library. Harvard University.

The Young Reformer. R951.R67t, Volume 5. Houghton Library. Harvard University. Electronic copy sponsored by the Theodore Roosevelt Center at Dickinson State University. For reproduction or publication permission, contact the Theodore Roosevelt Collection, Houghton Library.

Transcription of caption:

The Young Reformer.
There is a sufficient degree of firmness in Assemblyman Roosevelt’s nose, but corresponding benevolence in the line of beauty which begins at the eye-glasses and ends just above the nostrils. This style of nose shows an investigating turn of mind.

Posted by Krystal Thomas on May 31, 2011 in History  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

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