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Detective Work

Jun 29, 2011

As part of their time with us, we ask our digital cataloging interns to write a blog post to share some of their experiences and “finds” while working in the Roosevelt collections. As they start to wrap up their internship hours, we will start to share their blog entries with you. Here is one from Liza, based in Texas:

One of the most surprising things about working with the materials from the Theodore Roosevelt Center has been the amount of puzzling, identity-work involved. I had rather expected everything and everyone would be clearly identified, despite all the archival training and experience that should have had me anticipating the exact opposite.

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Posted by Liza Oldham on Jun 29, 2011 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (1)  |  Share this post

The Friars Question

Jun 27, 2011

As part of their time with us, we ask our digital cataloging interns to write a blog post to share some of their experiences and “finds” while working in the Roosevelt collections. As they start to wrap up their internship hours, we will start to share their blog entries with you. This one is from Storm based in Texas:

By the time of the Spanish-American War, the Catholic Friars had been in possession of much of the best lands in the Philippines for generations, making them perhaps the most despised foreigners on the islands. At the same time, many Filipinos resisted the U.S. occupation following Spain’s defeat in the war, thus launching a three-year guerrilla war. While much has been made of the insurgency and U.S. efforts to combat it—especially in light of later U.S. counterinsurgency efforts in Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan—little light has been shed on Roosevelt’s nuanced handling of the Friars problem.

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Posted by Storm Miller on Jun 27, 2011 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

The Key to Success in Life

Jun 22, 2011

Cover of the reprinted edition of the essay. 

Theodore Roosevelt, before he got caught up in politics, planned to earn his living by writing. It was an ambition he never gave up and even returned to once he left the White House. As a result, he is a president with over 40 books and hundreds of essays to his name.

Originally published in The Outlook, this particular edition of “The Key to Success in Life” was published in 1916 by Federated Publishing. I could discover little about its origins, so why it was reprinted by this company at this time, we do not know. Reading through it, I realized it is a sort of self-improvement guide, full of Roosevelt maxims.

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Posted by Krystal Thomas on Jun 22, 2011 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Bear Hunts in the White House

Jun 17, 2011

As part of their time with us, we ask our digital cataloging interns to write a blog post to share some of their experiences and “finds” while working in the Roosevelt collections. As they start to wrap up their internship hours, we will start to share their blog entries with you. This one is from Marie of Connecticut:

It was quickly apparent that the name Theodore Roosevelt could take on any number of meanings to any number of people. From my experiences cataloging his letters the past few weeks, I discovered a side of Roosevelt that may not be as well known; at least it wasn’t to me. I’ve had the opportunity to read fifteen years worth of letters he sent to his second son Kermit and have come to know Theodore Roosevelt the father.

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Posted by Marie Jarry on Jun 17, 2011 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Roosevelt as Reader and Writer

Jun 14, 2011

Theodore Roosevelt reading in his West Divide cabin on Colorado hunting trip, 1905.

As part of their time with us, we ask our digital cataloging interns to write a blog post to share some of their experiences and “finds” while working in the Roosevelt collections. As they start to wrap up their internship hours, we will start to share their blog entries with you. This first one is from Lynn of California:

Before I began working as a cataloging intern for the TR Center, I did not know that Theodore Roosevelt was a voracious reader and a popular author. In the documents I worked with, letters addressed to President Roosevelt spanning November 11, 1904 to December 9, 1904, the topics of reading, writing and publishing recur often.

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Posted by Lynn O'Connor on Jun 14, 2011 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post

Growing His Conservation Legacy

Jun 02, 2011

While the story of the Grand Canyon and even his first national refuge at Pelican Island are the most well-known stories, the smaller actions, the ones few of us remember now, are often more interesting.

Today in 1905, Theodore Roosevelt established the first game preserve in the United States by executive proclamation. Wichita Forest and Game Preserve was the nation’s first big-game animal refuge.

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Posted by Krystal Thomas on Jun 02, 2011 in History  |  Permalink  |  Comments (0)  |  Share this post