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Letter from Adelbert Moot to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Adelbert Moot congratulates President Roosevelt for inviting Booker T. Washington to the White House. Moot believes Roosevelt's conduct will have a great impact on the country.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Race--Political aspects; Racism; Dinners and dining; Judges--Selection and appointment; White House (Washington, D.C.); Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915; Jones, Thomas Goode, 1844-1914; Roosevelt, Edith Kermit Carow, 1861-1948

Date: 1901-10-25

Telegram from Booker T. Washington to James Sullivan Clarkson

Description:

Booker T. Washington is confident that President Roosevelt will continue with Mr. Roulhac's appointment even against white opposition.

Resource Type: Telegram

Subject: Employees--Appointment, qualifications, tenure, etc.; Race--Political aspects; African Americans--Politics and government; Press and politics; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1902-10-07

Anti-negro Republicans

Description:

The article chastises the Republican State Central Committee of Louisiana for including white supremacist statements in an official address. The Republican Party of Louisiana is mostly composed of African Americans but white Republicans use the party for patronage and profit, not principle.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Race--Political aspects; Race discrimination; Political ethics; African Americans--Politics and government; Louisiana; Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- )

Date: 1904-02-19

Letter from Thomas Collier Platt to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Senator Platt believes it will be difficult to gratify Booker T. Washington's request that Charles William Anderson be elected as a delegate to the Republican National Convention. However, he will make a memorandum about it and will discuss the matter with Governor Odell. 

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Republican National Convention; African Americans--Politics and government; Race--Political aspects; Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915; Odell, Benjamin B. (Benjamin Barker), 1854-1926; Anderson, Charles William, 1866-1938

Date: 1904-02-24

Letter from Thomas Collier Platt to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Senator Platt discussed with Governor Odell the possibility of electing Charles W. Anderson to the Republican National Convention. Odell believes that it would be very difficult and that it is hardly necessary or good policy to do so. Platt informs President Roosevelt that the State Committee passed a resolution endorsing his administration.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Republican National Convention; African Americans--Politics and government; Race--Political aspects; Presidents--Nomination; New York (State); Payn, Louis Frisbie, 1835-1923; Odell, Benjamin B. (Benjamin Barker), 1854-1926; Anderson, Charles William, 1866-1938

Date: 1904-02-27

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Booker T. Washington

Description:

President Roosevelt apprises Booker T. Washington of the current political situation. The National Committee has thrown out the Williams-Clarke organization because of its association with the Lily-White movement. Roosevelt believes that this can be a political advantage.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Race--Political aspects; Race discrimination--Political aspects; Louisiana; Republican National Committee (U.S.)

Date: 1904-06-17

Letter from Edward Grey to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

British Foreign Secretary Grey informs President Roosevelt that Ambassador Durand will be replaced, and while he understands Roosevelt's desire to have Arthur Lee in his place, that is politically impossible. Temporarily, Esmé Howard will be sent to Washington as Councillor to Embassy. Grey appreciated Roosevelt's explanation of his telegram to German Emperor Wilhelm after the Portsmouth Peace. Grey explains that his foreign policy is not anti-German, but to be independent he feels it necessary to strengthen the Entente with France and come to an agreement with Russia. Grey believes that his generation has had enough of war, and the British people feel a special bond with the United States. Grey hopes the dispute between Canada and the United States over Newfoundland will soon be settled. He also adds that many in Great Britain are upset over reports of slavery and plunder in the Belgian Congo.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Algeciras Conference; Moroccan Crisis (1904-1906); South African War (1899-1902); International Peace Conference; Diplomatic and consular service, British; Public opinion, American; Friendship; Opposition (Political science); Wealth; Diplomatic negotiations in international disputes; Treaties; International relations; Peace--International cooperation; War; International economic relations--Political aspects; Arms race; Arms race--Economic aspects; Alliances; Chauvinism and jingoism; Militarism; Anglo-Saxon race; Race--Political aspects; Religion and politics; Colonies--Administration; U.S. states--Politics and government; Slavery; Pillage; Imperialism; Rubber industry and trade; Washington (D.C.); Great Britain; Greece--Crete; Germany; Spain--Algeciras; France; New Hampshire--Portsmouth; Italy; Russia; Europe; Austria; Japan; Canada; Newfoundland and Labrador; China; Netherlands--Hague; Congo (Democratic Republic); Belgium; Liberal Party (Great Britain); Conservative Party (Great Britain); Durand, Henry Mortimer, Sir, 1850-1924; Ferguson, Robert Harry Munro, 1868-1922; William II, German Emperor, 1859-1941; White, Henry, 1850-1927; Bismarck, Otto, F├╝rst von, 1815-1898; Kruger, Paul, 1825-1904

Date: 1906-12-04

Letter from the Secretary of Theodore Roosevelt to Oscar K. Davis

Description:

The secretary of Theodore Roosevelt encloses a copy of a letter to Julian LaRose Harris. Roosevelt has considered Oscar K. Davis' suggestion but believes that the kind of attack Davis fears will be carried out even if Roosevelt follows the advice. Roosevelt thinks that it will be best to thoroughly cover the issue of race and the Progressive Party, provide all the facts, and answer questions honestly. The secretary requests that Davis arrange for a hundred copies of the enclosed letter for Mr. Wardrop.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Race--Political aspects; Harris, Julian LaRose, 1874-1963; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1912-08-01

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Julian LaRose Harris

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt describes in detail the challenging issue of race in the Progressive Party, as well as the Republican and Democratic Parties.  He says "We have made the Progressive issue a moral, not a racial issue." Roosevelt concludes that the Progressive Party, as well as Southern black men, will be best served by appealing to Southern white men who support civil rights.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Republican National Convention; Race--Political aspects; Progressivism (United States politics); Political parties--Officials and employees; Third parties (United States politics); African Americans--Civil rights; African Americans--Politics and government; Illinois--Chicago; Rhode Island; Maryland; New York (State); Indiana; Ohio; Illinois; New Jersey; Pennsylvania; National Progressive Convention; Progressive Party (1912); Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- ); Democratic Party (U.S.); Harris, Joel Chandler, 1848-1908; Beecher, Henry Ward, 1813-1887

Date: 1912-08-01

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Julian LaRose Harris

Description:

Oscar K. Davis releases this item for the morning papers of August 3, 1912. Theodore Roosevelt describes in detail the treatment of African Americans by both the Republican and Democratic Parties, but believes that for the Progressive Party, this issue is not a race issue, but a moral issue. Roosevelt concludes that the Progressive Party, as well as Southern black men, will be best served by appealing to Southern white men who support civil rights.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Republican National Convention; Race--Political aspects; Race relations; Progressivism (United States politics); Political parties--Officials and employees; Third parties (United States politics); African Americans--Civil rights; African Americans--Politics and government; American periodicals; Lynching; African Americans--Education--Finance; Illinois--Chicago; Rhode Island; Maryland; New York (State); Indiana; Ohio; New Jersey; Pennsylvania; National Progressive Convention; Progressive Party (1912); Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- ); Democratic Party (U.S.); Harris, Joel Chandler, 1848-1908; Davis, Oscar K. (Oscar King), 1866-1932; Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882; Beecher, Henry Ward, 1813-1887

Date: 1912-08-01

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