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Letter from Henry Cabot Lodge to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Henry Cabot Lodge discusses the impact on the Republican and Democratic parties of the debate over the gold vs. silver standard. He also considers the level of support in various regions of the nation for several likely presidential candidates. Lodge responds to Theodore Roosevelt's critique of Representative Thomas B. Reed for not speaking out firmly enough in support of the gold standard when he cast a vote on legislation dealing with “gold bonds.” Lodge asks Roosevelt to “straighten out” George W. Smalley, the American correspondent of the London Times and a personal friend and promoter of Roosevelt’s, on the true American sentiment regarding the Monroe Doctrine.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Silver question; Gold standard; Monroe doctrine; Tammany Hall; Reed, Thomas B. (Thomas Brackett), 1839-1902; Cleveland, Grover, 1837-1908; Smalley, George W. (George Washburn), 1833-1916; McKinley, William, 1843-1901; Harrison, Benjamin, 1833-1901; Morton, Levi P. (Levi Parsons), 1824-1920; Grant, Frederick Dent, 1850-1912; Cowles, Anna Roosevelt, 1855-1931; Roosevelt, Edith Kermit Carow, 1861-1948; Ferguson, Ronald Craufurd Munro, 1860-1934

Date: 1895-08-10

"Give it another twist, Grover - we're all with you!"

Description:

President Grover Cleveland, wearing military uniform, gives a twist to the British Lion's tail as it stands on a small island labeled "Great Britain" just off the coast of the "United States" where Cleveland and his backers are standing. Among Cleveland's backers are Thomas B. Reed, Charles A. Dana doing a headstand on the "N.Y. Sun," George F. Hoar holding a rifle, William E. Chandler wearing a grenadier's bearskin hat and holding a sword, Henry C. Lodge with a sword, John T. Morgan, and Charles A. Boutelle also wearing a bearskin hat.

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Intervention (International law); Monroe doctrine; Lions; Militarism; Nationalism; Cleveland, Grover, 1837-1908; Reed, Thomas B. (Thomas Brackett), 1839-1902; Dana, Charles A. (Charles Anderson), 1819-1897; Hoar, George Frisbie, 1826-1904; Chandler, William E. (William Eaton), 1835-1917; Lodge, Henry Cabot, 1850-1924; Morgan, J. T. (John Tyler), 1824-1907; Boutelle, Charles A. (Charles Addison), 1839-1901

Date: 1896-01-08

They can't fight

Description:

Uncle Sam and John Bull are about to come to blows, possibly over the Venezuela boundary dispute, but are tied together in ribbons that are labeled "Financial Ties, Mutual Needs, Property Interests, International Marriages, Trade Interests, Mutual Commercial Benefits, Ties of Kinship, [and] Social Ties."

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Uncle Sam (Symbolic character); John Bull (Symbolic character); Intervention (International law); Monroe doctrine

Date: 1896-01-15

"Let us have peace"

Description:

President Grover Cleveland and British Prime Minister Robert Cecil, Lord Salisbury, are dressed as Native Americans, smoking peace pipes filled with "Common Sense Tobacco." Sitting with Cleveland, also dressed as natives, are Richard Olney, Robert R. Hitt, Charles A. Boutelle, Nelson Dingley, George F. Hoar, William E. Chandler, John T. Morgan, and Henry Cabot Lodge. Sitting with Salisbury are Joseph Chamberlain, Arthur J. Balfour, George J. Goschen, and the Duke of Devonshire, Spencer C. Cavendish. In the foreground is a hatchet in a hole, to be buried, possibly over the Venezuela boundary dispute.

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Intervention (International law); Indians of North America; Calumets; Peace; Pipe smoking; Monroe doctrine; Cleveland, Grover, 1837-1908; Olney, Richard, 1835-1917; Hitt, Robert R. (Robert Roberts), 1834-1906; Boutelle, Charles A. (Charles Addison), 1839-1901; Dingley, Nelson, 1832-1899; Hoar, George Frisbie, 1826-1904; Chandler, William E. (William Eaton), 1835-1917; Morgan, J. T. (John Tyler), 1824-1907; Lodge, Henry Cabot, 1850-1924; Salisbury, Robert Cecil, Marquess of, 1830-1903; Chamberlain, Joseph, 1836-1914; Devonshire, Spencer Compton Cavendish, Duke of, 1833-1908; Goschen, George Joachim Goschen, Viscount, 1831-1907; Balfour, Arthur James, 1848-1930

Date: 1896-01-22

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to William S. Cowles

Description:

Commissioner Roosevelt is working hard to organize the New York Police Department as he might be "legislated out of office." He believes that he has accomplished a great deal. Roosevelt agrees with Captain Cowles that if Great Britain accepts arbitration or peacefully settles with Venezuela then European nations will recognize the Monroe Doctrine. Corinne Roosevelt Robinson has been staying with Roosevelt. Her health is poor but everyone is enjoying her company.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Police administration; Monroe doctrine; International relations; Books and reading; Venezuela; New York (N.Y.). Police Department; Cowles, Anna Roosevelt, 1855-1931; Robinson, Corinne Roosevelt, 1861-1933; Robinson, Douglas, 1855-1918; Mahan, A. T. (Alfred Thayer), 1840-1914; Greene, F. V. (Francis Vinton), 1850-1921

Date: 1896-02-11

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to William S. Cowles

Description:

Commissioner Roosevelt is interested in a "properly vigorous foreign policy," including seacoast defense and a "first class navy." He would like American intervention in Cuba and a farsighted policy that would remove European powers from the western hemisphere. He asks how American warships are armed compared to European navies. Upcoming legislation will determine the influence Roosevelt can wield on the Board of Police Commissioners.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: International relations; Sea-power; Warships--Designs and plans; Naval art and science; Monroe doctrine; Police administration--Law and legislation; Cuba; New York (N.Y.). Police Department; Cowles, Anna Roosevelt, 1855-1931; Parker, Andrew D.

Date: 1896-04-05

Uncle Sam's picnic

Description:

Uncle Sam helps four little girls labeled "Philippines, Ladrones, Porto Rico, [and] Cuba" onto a wagon filled with many other young children, including "Hawaii." Two horses harnessed to the wagon are labeled "Liberty" and "Union." An old man, wearing a hat labeled "Monroe Doctrine," sits on a log nearby and asks Sam if the wagon isn't getting too full.

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Uncle Sam (Symbolic character); Monroe doctrine; Imperialism; Carriages and carts; Picnics; Annexation; Children

Date: 1898-09-28

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to William S. Cowles

Description:

Governor Roosevelt believes that the proposed canal should be fortified. If it is not, the canal would be another weak point to watch over during a conflict. If the canal had existed during the Spanish-American War, American forces would have needed to defend the canal to prevent the Spanish fleet from crossing into the Pacific Ocean and causing problems in a new theater. Roosevelt also favors an American canal as he does not want to see European powers gain new interests in the Americas.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Spanish-American War (1898); Canals--Government policy; Canals, Interoceanic--Design and construction; Naval strategy; Monroe doctrine; International relations; Great Britain; Germany; France; Central America; Oregon (Battleship); Cervera y Topete, Pascual, 1839-1909; Dewey, George, 1837-1917

Date: 1900-02-26

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt to Bradley T. Johnson

Description:

Vice President Roosevelt responds to General Johnson's letter of May 25, 1901, and reflects on his friendship with the General. Roosevelt also reacts to the international press's criticism of a recent speech he gave in Buffalo, New York. 

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Monroe doctrine; Military policy; International relations--Press coverage; Thank-you notes; Wives; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Politicians--Public opinion; European newspapers; England--City of London; Germany; New York (State)--Buffalo; Monroe, James, 1758-1831

Date: 1901-05-31

Address of Vice President Roosevelt, Minnesota State Fair, Minneapolis, Sept. 2nd, 1901

Description:

Draft of a speech with handwritten corrections. Vice President Roosevelt advocates for a vigorous policy at home and abroad of seeking justice and battling "barbarism" exemplified by the proverb, "Speak softly and carry a big stick--you will go far."

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: Frontier and pioneer life; International relations; International relations--Philosophy; Monroe doctrine; Civilization, Modern--American influences; Civilization, Modern--Moral and ethical aspects; Philippines; Cuba; Abbott, Lyman, 1835-1922

Date: 1901-09-02

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