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Permanent preparedness is vital need--Roosevelt

Description:

In this Kansas City Star editorial, Theodore Roosevelt makes the case for constant military preparedness in addition to cautiously entering a league of nations.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Military readiness; International relations; Pacifists; Editorials; League of Nations; Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924

Date: 1918

Speech of Colonel Roosevelt at Springfield, Illinois

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt demands a call to arms against Germany, to protect America's ideals of freedom and democracy. He also argues that the United States should have gone to war much earlier than it had, but now it is important to fully support the war effort and the men fighting overseas. According to Roosevelt, "the foundation of our permanent civilization" rests on the land owning farmer.

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: World War (1914-1918); World War (1914-1918)--Peace; Patriotism; Loyalty; Agriculture; Illinois--Springfield; Germany; League of Nations; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865

Date: 1918-08-26

Speech of Colonel Roosevelt at Lafayette Day Exercises, Aldermanic Chambers, New York City

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt speaks about remaining loyal and patriotic in a time of war. It is especially important to stay strong and patriotic during the peace process. Roosevelt mentions the League of Nations and says that he would be glad to support such an organization as long as it was not a substitute for strength.

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: World War (1914-1918); World War (1914-1918)--Peace; Peace; New York (State)--LaFayette; France; Germany; League of Nations

Date: 1918-09-06

Speech of Colonel Roosevelt at Billings, Montana

Description: Theodore Roosevelt is speaking to the people of Billings, Montana, about denying Germany acceptance into the League of Nations and believes that their surrender should be absolute. Roosevelt reads off the complaints of the farmer in Montana. Roosevelt also discusses the Non-Partisan League and the Industrial Workers of the World.

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: World War (1914-1918); World War (1914-1918)--Peace; Patriotism; Farmers; Labor unions; Montana--Billings; Germany; League of Nations

Date: 1918-10-05

Notes from Gifford Pinchot on Woodrow Wilson's appeal of October 25, 1918

Description:

Gifford Pinchot offers his opinions on the 1918 midterm elections, which are happening at the same time as negotiations to end World War I. President Wilson described the elections as a referendum on his leadership, and hopes that the American public will return a Democratic majority in both houses. Pinchot believes that Americans are calling for Germany's unconditional surrender, not the "peace without victory" being pursued by Wilson, so he hopes that a Republican Congress will be elected and that the country will "stop talking peace and get on with war."

Resource Type: Note

Subject: World War (1914-1918); Diplomatic negotiations in international disputes; Press and politics; Elections; War; Germany; Democratic Party (U.S.); Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- ); United States. Congress; League of Nations; Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924; Harvey, George Brinton McClellan, 1864-1928; Lodge, Henry Cabot, 1850-1924; Poindexter, Miles, 1868-1946

Date: 1918-10-25

Largely about League and law lessons

Description:

Theodore Roosevelt gives his opinion on the proposed League of Nations,  how it should be formed and the position the United States should take. Item contains two typed copies of the article.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: International relations; League of Nations; Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924

Date: 1918-12

Letter from Gifford Pinchot to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Gifford Pinchot was away and then involved in an important legal matter. Regarding the farmers, Congress and executives should not be the only ones in control. Rather, farmers' organizations should be supported and their input welcomed by the government. Pinchot also leaves notes with page numbers next to topics relating to labor and business; with more time he could have done more. Pinchot thinks a first draft is "not a fair subject of criticism" but does not feel the letter measures up to Roosevelt's usual level of writing. Pinchot concludes by remarking that he enjoyed Roosevelt's article on the League of Nations. 

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: World War (1914-1918); Periodicals--Publishing; Labor; Farmers--Societies, etc.; Farmers--Political activity; Employees--Employment; Manuscripts--Editing; Soldiers; Pennsylvania--Philadelphia; League of Nations; Pinchot, Cornelia Bryce, 1881-1960; Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924

Date: 1918-12-15

Letter from William Dudley Foulke to Gifford Pinchot

Description:

Although William Dudley Foulke has an "utter abhorrence" of President Woodrow Wilson, he fears that the Republican Party offers even worse alternatives. Foulke disagrees with the Republican Party about tariffs and the formation of the League of Nations and discusses the challenges facing railroad and communications privatization now that the war has ended. He also believes that momentum is with the nationalization of industries and that America cannot go back to "reduced wages, longer hours." As when he was advocating for Theodore Roosevelt's progressive principles, Foulke believes that the greatest security against "the menace of socialism" is offering equal opportunity.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: World War (1914-1918); Government ownership; Railroads and state; Socialism; Tariff; McKinley tariff; Communism; Income tax; Inheritance and transfer tax; Democratic Party (U.S.); League of Nations; Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- ); Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919; Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924; Lodge, Henry Cabot, 1850-1924; Knox, Philander C. (Philander Chase), 1853-1921; Taft, William H. (William Howard), 1857-1930

Date: 1918-12-24

Letter from Gifford Pinchot to Josephine M. Striker

Description:

Gifford Pinchot feels that there may be misrepresentation of Theodore Roosevelt's views after his death. An example of this may be the League of Nations. Pinchot believes that Roosevelt was "the first American of importance to advocate a League." Pinchot would like a reference to support this.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Death; Reporters and reporting; League of Nations; Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1919-01-18

Letter to Gifford Pinchot

Description:

Gifford Pinchot is advised to look at Theodore Roosevelt's editorials in the Kansas City Star and Metropolitan Magazine about the League of Nations. Roosevelt was in favor of the League as an addition, rather than a substitute, for the United States' own prepared military strength.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Editorials; Peace movements; League of Nations

Date: 1919-01-21

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