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Letter from Whitelaw Reid to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Whitelaw Reid writes to President Roosevelt to discuss a conversation he had with Ronald Munro Ferguson regarding British and American politics. He also discusses Great Britain's treaty with Japan and expresses his hope that the British provided at least a hint of such an agreement with the president. He includes a lengthy, handwritten addition congratulating Roosevelt on his coordination of the peace conference.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905); International relations; Diplomatic and consular service; Peace; Treaties; Great Britain; Japan; India; Lansdowne, Henry Charles Keith Petty-FitzMaurice, Marquess of, 1845-1927; Edward VII, King of Great Britain, 1841-1910; Durand, Henry Mortimer, Sir, 1850-1924; Campbell-Bannerman, Henry, Sir, 1836-1908; Asquith, H. H., (Herbert Henry), 1852-1928; Grey of Fallodon, Edward Grey, Viscount, 1862-1933; William II, German Emperor, 1859-1941; Vitte, S. I︠U︡. (Sergeĭ I︠U︡lʹevich), graf, 1849-1915

Date: 1905-09-02

Letter from Whitelaw Reid to Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt

Description:

Whitelaw Reid discusses opinions and happenings of prominent British politicians and figureheads including Winston Churchill, Sir Curzon, Sir Campbell-Bannerman and Lady Campbell-Bannerman, and Sir Trevelyan. Reid also discusses a recent sightseeing trip to Winchester Cathedral, Winchester College, and Farnham Castle. Reid describes the experience of dining with "minor" royalty, plans for Alice Roosevelt Longworth's upcoming visit, typical court proceedings, and problems with admission to Parliament.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Politicians--Public opinion; Politicians--Conduct of life; Public speaking; Gossip; Books--Historiography; Cathedrals--Design and construction; Religion--Social aspects; Dinners and dining; Courts and courtiers--Portraits; Great Britain; Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons; Winchester Cathedral; Winchester College; Churchill, Winston, 1874-1965; Curzon of Kedleston, George Nathaniel Curzon, Marquess, 1859-1925; Campbell-Bannerman, Henry, Sir, 1836-1908; Trevelyan, George Otto, 1838-1928; Longworth, Alice Roosevelt, 1884-1980; Grey of Fallodon, Edward Grey, Viscount, 1862-1933

Date: 1906-06-01

Letter from Whitelaw Reid to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Ambassador Reid discusses international relations with President Roosevelt including the situations in Algeciras and Morocco. Reid also writes about King Edward VII and the British press, and Kaiser Wilhelm II and the German press. Apparently, tensions are beginning to grow between England and Germany in the European arena.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Algeciras Conference; Diplomatic and consular service, American; International relations; Morocco; Spain--Algeciras; Great Britain; Germany; France; Root, Elihu, 1845-1937; Cowles, Anna Roosevelt, 1855-1931; Longworth, Alice Roosevelt, 1884-1980; William II, German Emperor, 1859-1941; Edward VII, King of Great Britain, 1841-1910; Grey of Fallodon, Edward Grey, Viscount, 1862-1933

Date: 1906-06-19

Letter from Whitelaw Reid to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Whitelaw Reid tells President Roosevelt that Alice Roosevelt Longworth did him credit during her stay and regrets she did not have time to write. Reid then brings Roosevelt up-to-date on a number of issues. Reid thinks that Roosevelt's statement about canned meats will have a positive effect on the market; William Jennings Bryan did not do so well at speaking at dinner as he could have, but most of the ministers seem to want to meet him. Sir Gray cannot remove Ambassador to the United States Durand without Durand losing his pension; King Edward is not receiving as many people as usual, so it might be possible to present Silas McBee to him, but Reid will push if the President would like him to. Also, there is worry in Egypt and France about the Mohammedan fanaticism.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Ambassadors; Canned meat; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Great Britain. Parliament; British Information Services; Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925; Durand, Henry Mortimer, Sir, 1850-1924; Edward VII, King of Great Britain, 1841-1910; Grey of Fallodon, Edward Grey, Viscount, 1862-1933; Longworth, Alice Roosevelt, 1884-1980; McBee, Silas, 1853-1924

Date: 1906-07-17

Letter from Andrew Carnegie to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Andrew Carnegie has enclosed Prime Minister Bannerman's speech from the recent conference. Carnegie had showed President Roosevelt's most recent letter to both Bannerman as well as John Morley and other Cabinet members. Morley referenced Roosevelt's note again in a letter and was influenced by it in his decision making process about the Cabinet. Carnegie thinks Roosevelt's policy will be welcomed and followed elsewhere. Elihu Root has sent Carnegie a confidential report on the Russians. Carnegie sends well wishes to Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt and notes that his wife Louise Whitfield Carnegie places the Roosevelts high on their book. 

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Government policy; England; France; Russia (Federation); Grey of Fallodon, Edward Grey, Viscount, 1862-1933; Roosevelt, Edith Kermit Carow, 1861-1948

Date: 1906-07-27

Letter from Whitelaw Reid to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Ambassador Reid reports to President Roosevelt about affairs in Europe. Reid's impression is that neither Great Britain nor Germany want tensions to escalate to a war, and he is still trying to get more details about their negotiations. Reid informs Roosevelt that the King seems to be in ill health. He is also worried that Roosevelt's friend, Silas McBee, is stirring up trouble by seeming to interfere in debates about the Education Bill. Reid referred the Grocers' Federation to Secretaries Wilson and Metcalf so that they might receive more information about complying with America's meat inspection laws, and he enclosed a copy of a speech he gave at Cambridge on the American Revolution. Reid concludes by saying that he hopes the British government will help the United States settle disputes with Canada.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Algeciras Conference; Moroccan Crisis (1904-1906); American Revolution (1775-1783); Diplomatic negotiations in international disputes; International relations; Socialism; Imperialism; Kings and rulers--Health and hygiene; Kings and rulers--Public opinion; Diplomatic and consular service; Educational law and legislation; Religion and politics; Trade associations; Meat inspection--Law and legislation; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Boundary disputes; Sealing; Fisheries; Spain--Algeciras; England; France; Germany; Egypt; Russia; England--London; Italy; Italy--Rome; Japan; Canada; Newfoundland and Labrador; Labour Party (Great Britain); Socialist Party of Great Britain; Great Britain. Sovereign; United States. Department of Agriculture; United States. Department of Commerce and Labor; Harvard University; Yale University; University of Cambridge; United States. Department of State; Great Britain. Foreign Office; Edward VII, King of Great Britain, 1841-1910; Grey of Fallodon, Edward Grey, Viscount, 1862-1933; Durand, Henry Mortimer, Sir, 1850-1924; William II, German Emperor, 1859-1941; McBee, Silas, 1853-1924; Victor Emmanuel III, King of Italy, 1869-1947; Lodge, Henry Cabot, 1850-1924; Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925; Wilson, James, 1835-1920; Metcalf, Victor Howard, 1853-1936; Root, Elihu, 1845-1937

Date: 1906-08-16

Letter from Andrew Carnegie to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Andrew Carnegie agrees with President Roosevelt on disarmament, although he recognizes that it will be difficult to formulate a satisfactory plan. Carnegie says Roosevelt's declaration that the U.S. does not seek to increase the present Navy but only to maintain it will be the great force making for agreement. Carnegie criticizes the practice of failing to give previous notice of war before attacking, and presents the "League of Peace" idea as the easiest and best solution. He encourages Roosevelt to be the one to formally propose it, as the U.S. is the only great power "free from international jealousies."

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905); International relations--Treaties; Peace; Arbitration (International law); Disarmament; Editorials; Arms control--International cooperation; Military operations, Naval; Great Britain; Ireland; Netherlands--Hague; Japan; Russia; Canada; Italy; Switzerland; Belgium; Spain; Portugal; New York Times Company; United States. Navy; Conservative Party (Great Britain); Armed Forces (United States); Grey of Fallodon, Edward Grey, Viscount, 1862-1933; Root, Elihu, 1845-1937; Morley, John, 1838-1923; Bryce, James Bryce, Viscount, 1838-1922; Campbell-Bannerman, Henry, Sir, 1836-1908; William II, German Emperor, 1859-1941; Tower, Charlemagne, 1848-1923; Roosevelt, Edith Kermit Carow, 1861-1948

Date: 1906-08-27

Letter from Francis Alexander Campbell to Whitelaw Reid

Description:

On behalf of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs Edward Grey, Assistant Under-Secretary of State Francis Alexander Campbell sends a series of proposals for a provisional agreement for the forthcoming herring fishery off the coast of Newfoundland to U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom Whitelaw Reid.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: International relations; Fisheries; Herring fisheries; Fishery law and legislation; Newfoundland and Labrador; Newfoundland and Labrador--Placentia; Newfoundland and Labrador--Twillingate; Newfoundland and Labrador--Fortune; Grey of Fallodon, Edward Grey, Viscount, 1862-1933

Date: 1906-09-03

Letter from Whitelaw Reid to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Ambassador Reid has forwarded President Roosevelt's letter to the people of Salisbury, and he is sure it will promote kindly feeling. Reid hopes that they may be able to bring the "slow-moving" Colonial Office to an early agreement, as the only currently contentious issue between the parties is that of purse-nets. Reports of William Jennings Bryan's speech in Madison Square Garden produced instant revulsion in Great Britain, as the public thought he "dished" himself by proposing government ownership of the railways. Reid has not yet had a chance to discuss Roosevelt's letter to Andrew Carnegie with Sir Edward Grey, but plans to bring it up at first chance. Frederick Scott Oliver, author of the new book about Hamilton, does not seem to be a prominent literary figure among the Englishmen Reid has asked. Reid has been watching the Cuban situation with great anxiety, as he has always believed the United States made foolish decisions about Cuba at the beginning of the Spanish-American War. 

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Algeciras Conference; Spanish-American War (1898); International relations; Finance; Public opinion; Political candidates; Sailors; Fishing; Military operations, Artillery; Military operations, Naval; Export duties; Luncheons; Government ownership; United States territories and possessions; Clippings (Books, newspapers, etc.); Press and politics; Speeches, addresses, etc.; Diplomatic and consular service; English language--Orthography and spelling; Great Britain; Canada; Newfoundland and Labrador; India; Cuba; Germany; England--London; Ohio; Spain; Great Britain. Parliament; Great Britain. Colonial Office; Great Britain. Foreign Office; Madison Square Garden (New York, N.Y.); United States. Congress; Hardinge, Charles Hardinge, Baron, 1858-1944; Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925; Cambon, Pierre Paul, 1843-1924; Grey of Fallodon, Edward Grey, Viscount, 1862-1933; Oliver, Frederick Scott, 1864-1934; Birrell, Augustine, 1850-1933; Haggard, H. Rider (Henry Rider), 1856-1925; Kipling, Rudyard, 1865-1936; Burton, Theodore E. (Theodore Elijah), 1851-1929; Longworth, Alice Roosevelt, 1884-1980; Adams, John Quincy, 1767-1848; Carnegie, Andrew, 1835-1919; Edward VII, King of Great Britain, 1841-1910; William II, German Emperor, 1859-1941; Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804

Date: 1906-09-14

Letter from Whitelaw Reid to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Ambassador Reid updates President Roosevelt on several diplomatic matters in England. The most pertinent issue is the English government's desire to retire Sir Mortimer Durand and to find a suitable replacement for him. Many people have been discussed. Roosevelt's choice, Cecil Spring Rice, could not be promoted to an Embassy without using a lot of "ill will." Reid also sends Roosevelt a news clipping telling of the "fall" that Winston Churchill took out of playwright George Bernard Shaw. Finally, Reid updates Roosevelt on a dramatic matter involving trouble Democratic Senator Francis Cockrell's son ran into while traveling abroad.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: International relations; Diplomats; Diplomatic and consular service, British; England; Canada; Spring Rice, Cecil, Sir, 1859-1918; Grey of Fallodon, Edward Grey, Viscount, 1862-1933; Durand, Henry Mortimer, Sir, 1850-1924; Churchill, Winston, 1874-1965; Cockrell, Francis Marion, 1834-1915

Date: 1906-10-24

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