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Father Knick--will this do?

Description:

Father Knickerbocker approaches Theodore Roosevelt with babies in arms and a crowd of others at his heels. Papers lie on the floor reading "Race suicide a crime" and "126,000 new New Yorkers." Likely published between 1900 and 1904.

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Infants; Population--Moral and ethical aspects; Birth control; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1902?

President Roosevelt at Des Moines

Description:

President Roosevelt hands back a crying baby to its mother, while turning to look at the next baby being thrust at him. A long line of mothers, each with one or more children, have already met Roosevelt and the line of mothers waiting extends off the edge of the cartoon. Caption: What does he think about race suicide now?

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Children; Birth control; Iowa--Des Moines; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1903-05-01

Letter from Jacob A. Riis to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Jacob A. Riis summarizes a few aspects of a pamphlet by Dr. Braunsen which he translated for Theodore Roosevelt. Braunsen believes that a mother should nurse their own child and nursing is a natural way to limit further pregnancies. He also believes that an easy lifestyle and overeating reduce the birthrate. Braunsen opposes Nathan Straus and pasteurization as it kills useful bacteria and rots the milk.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Breastfeeding promotion; Breastfeeding--Health aspects; Childbirth; Birth control; Milk--Pasteurization; Pamphlets; Straus, Nathan, 1848-1931

Date: 1911-09-14

The woman rebel: No gods no masters

Description:

Margaret Sanger writes that the first edition of her journal The Woman Rebel was returned by the postmaster because it violated anti-obscenity laws. Sanger sarcastically declares her intentions to be more patriotic, claiming she will follow former President Roosevelt's example and champion for large families. However, while Roosevelt stated the country needed large families to prevent race suicide, Sanger claims that large numbers of children are necessary to "uphold" all of America's areas of failing--public schools, factories, asylums, prisons, courts, and "slums"--in a satirical critique. 

Resource Type: Journal article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Periodicals; Birth control--Public opinion; Obscenity (Law); Censorship; United States. Post Office Department; United States. Postmaster General; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1914-04

History of education

Description:

In her draft of a speech in response to her trial on The Woman Rebel dissemination, Margaret Sanger discusses social problems and the manner in which birth control can address these issues and help the working class. Sanger critiques anti-obscenity laws and the notion of birth control education as pornography. She asks whether former President Roosevelt is truly moral for encouraging large families and she is immoral for encouraging small families. Sanger also addresses the charge that her article concerning an assassination attempt incited murder. She includes quotations from well-known ancient orators and writers and also from Roosevelt, claiming that if these writings on assassination are not accused of inciting murder, she should not be accused of such either. 

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Public opinion; Birth control--Moral and ethical aspects; Obscenity (Law); Censorship; Working class; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Motherhood; Pornography--Censorship; Poverty; Abortion; Prostitution; Assassination--Moral and ethical aspects; United States. Post Office Department; United States. Postmaster General; Charles Scribner's Sons; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1916-01

Scores U.S. law which bars talk on birth control

Description:

At an engagement at the Hotel Wisconsin, Margaret Sanger discussed birth control, claiming that wealthy women were aware how to prevent pregnancy but working class women did not have access to this information. Sanger indignantly protested that while former President Roosevelt was allowed to travel around the United States and urge couples to have large families, she was not allowed to provide information to women to prevent numerous pregnancies. She further argued that the immorality argument leveled against birth control was identical to the one leveled earlier against women in higher education.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Moral and ethical aspects; Birth control--Press coverage; Birth control--Public opinion; Families; Women in higher education; Immorality; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Wisconsin--Milwaukee; Hotel Wisconsin (Milwaukee, Wis.); Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1916-04-27

Limit families: Better humanity

Description:

The Detroit News reports that Margaret Sanger spoke on birth control education, arguing for the benefit it would hold for the working class. Sanger discussed the idea of race suicide and how former President Roosevelt claimed that his presidency would end the problem in the United States by encouraging large families. She stated, "Nobody called Roosevelt immoral for advocating larger families. I wonder if you will call me immoral for advocating small families."

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Press coverage; Birth control--Public opinion; Birth control--Moral and ethical aspects; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Working class; Child labor; New York (State); Michigan--Detroit; Japan; Netherlands; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1916-05-03

Birth control expounded here

Description:

The Indianapolis Star reports on Margaret Sanger's speech about birth control at the Claypool Hotel in Indianapolis, Indiana. Sanger discussed the importance of providing birth control information to working class women in order to reduce and prevent infant and maternal mortality, poverty, abortion, and prostitution. She argued that if former President Roosevelt was allowed to travel the country and urge families to have many children, she should be allowed to give poor women the information they needed. In reference to Roosevelt's concerns over race suicide, Sanger stated, "I say the race ought to commit suicide unless it can take care of its children better."

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Press coverage; Birth control--Public opinion; Birth control--Moral and ethical aspects; Abortion; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Infants (Newborn)--Mortality; Motherhood; New Zealand; Netherlands; Indiana--Indianapolis; Claypool Hotel (Indianapolis, Ind.); Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865

Date: 1916-05-16

Woman rebel scores Roosevelt as enslaver of mothers in U.S.

Description:

In an interview with Margaret Sanger, the Denver Post reports on the reformer's efforts in the area of birth control and her desire for "better babies or no babies." Sanger claimed that former President Roosevelt had "enslaved" American women and children with his policies and ideas concerning family reproduction. She stated that Roosevelt's efforts in encouraging American couples to rear large families was "willy-nilly" and that the former president's personality encouraged people, particularly women, to listen to him. Sanger emphatically called Roosevelt "foolish" and accused him of creating "tenants for our insane asylums, prisons and alms' houses."

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Public opinion; Birth control--Press coverage; Obscenity (Law); Families; Working class; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Colorado--Denver; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1916-05-17

"Woman rebel" tells need of birth control

Description:

The Denver Express reports on Margaret Sanger's birth control speech at Marble Hall in Denver, Colorado. Sanger discussed the benefit of birth control for the working class. She also took issue with former President Roosevelt's widely-disseminated ideas about race suicide, stating that if the race cannot take better care of its children, then it should commit suicide.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Press coverage; Birth control--Public opinion; Working class; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Poverty; Colorado--Denver; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1916-05-28

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