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Letter from Thomas Lafayette Rosser to John Lowndes McLaurin

Description:

General Rosser thanks Senator McLaurin for the letter concerning the 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution. Rosser hopes to call a conference to discuss "negro suffrage" which he believes will inevitably be limited in the southern United States. He suggests altering the 15th amendment to prevent discrimination in federal elections but allowing states to handle their own affairs.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: African Americans--Politics and government; African Americans--Suffrage; Race discrimination; Constitutional amendments; States' rights (American politics); Southern States; Constitution (United States); Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1901-12-18

Letter from John Lowndes McLaurin to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Senator McLaurin attempts to clarify his views on African American suffrage. McLaurin supports states being able to restrict suffrage and thus prevent "negro domination." A small "intelligent electorate" of African Americans can effectively protect their race and serve as a balance of power in the South. McLaurin wants "division of thought" over racial divisions.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: African Americans--Politics and government; African Americans--Suffrage; States' rights (American politics); Race discrimination; Southern States

Date: 1901-12-19

Letter from John Lowndes McLaurin to Thomas Lafayette Rosser

Description:

Senator McLaurin explains his position on African American suffrage and repealing the 15th Amendment.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Suffrage; African Americans--Suffrage; Election law; Southern States; Constitution (United States)

Date: 1901-12-19

Letter from Jeter Connelly Pritchard to James Sullivan Clarkson

Description:

Senator Pritchard is ill but hopes to attend and address the Alabama Republican State Convention. He believes that Republicans can make substantial gains in Alabama and the South.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: African Americans--Suffrage; Elections; Gerrymandering; Alabama; Southern States; Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- )

Date: 1902-09-15

Letter from Booker T. Washington to James Sullivan Clarkson

Description:

Booker T. Washington expresses his concerns over the lack of voting rights for African Americans in the South. He places the blame on Democrats and "lily white" Republicans.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: African Americans--Suffrage; Racism; White supremacy movements; Southern States; Democratic Party (U.S.); Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- ); Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1902-09-15

Letter from Booker T. Washington to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Booker T. Washington believes that he can work with James Sullivan Clarkson and that Clarkson understands the Alabama situation. The opposition to "decent, property holding Negroes" by Republican leaders in Alabama is morally wrong and will affect the African American vote in the northern states. Washington hopes that President Roosevelt will rebuke the actions of these Republicans.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: African Americans--Politics and government; African Americans--Suffrage; Racism; Alabama; Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- ); Clarkson, James Sullivan, 1842-1918

Date: 1902-09-27

Letter from James Sullivan Clarkson to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Charles William Anderson declines the mission to Liberia because of the fatalities that Americans tended to incur.  Clarkson would like to keep Anderson in New York as he is doing an excellent job recruiting African Americans to the Republican Party. After Anderson is able to recruit African Americans in Brooklyn and Manhattan to the Republican cause, he is to go to the rest of the state.  There is work to set up Republican clubs in New York state.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: African Americans--Politics and government; Diplomatic and consular service; African Americans--Suffrage; New York (State); New York (State)--New York--Manhattan; New York (State)--New York--Brooklyn; Liberia; Republican Party (N.Y.); Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- ); Odell, Benjamin B. (Benjamin Barker), 1854-1926; Anderson, Charles William, 1866-1938

Date: 1902-12-12

Letter from William Miles Hazzard to Elihu Root

Description:

William Miles Hazzard provides his opinions regarding solutions to the "negro problem" and party politics in South Carolina and other southern states. He believes that southern states could be carried for the Republican Party if they could "conceive some plan to eliminate the negro from politics."

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: African Americans--Politics and government; African Americans--Suffrage; Local officials and employees--Selection and appointment; South Carolina; Southern States; Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- ); Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1903-02-13

Letter from Joseph Bucklin Bishop to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Joseph Bucklin Bishop thinks that President Roosevelt will find President Lincoln's utterances on "negro suffrage" to be interesting. He believes that Roosevelt's enemies are doing him more service than his friends.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: African Americans--Suffrage; Presidents--Quotations; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865

Date: 1903-02-15

Is this the voice of the South?

Description:

South Carolina Senator Benjamin R. Tillman and Virginia Representative A. C. Braxton, both Southerners, recently delivered speeches in New York. Following Senator Tillman's speech, in which he spoke derogatorily of African Americans, southern newspapers denied that he represented the views of the South. However, both Representative Braxton's speech and the reception it received gave a different impression. Braxton denounced the Fifteenth Amendment and heralded the restrictions Southern states have put on voting, ensuring that "the vast sea of ignorant, venial and vicious negroes is now safely and perpetually shut out." Braxton is well respected in his state and was cheered enthusiastically by southerners who live in New York.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Speeches, addresses, etc.; African Americans--Suffrage; Race discrimination; Clippings (Books, newspapers, etc.); Tillman, Benjamin R. (Benjamin Ryan), 1847-1918; Braxton, A. Caperton (Allen Caperton), 1862-1914

Date: 1903-02?

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