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A family party - the 200th birthday of the healthiest of Uncle Sam's adopted children

Description:

Uncle Sam stands at the head of a table at a dinner party in honor of the "Bi-Centennial Celebration of the First German Settlement." Columbia sits next to him. Around the table are a "Spaniard, Swede, German, Englishman, Russian, Chinese, Irishman" and at the far end an "Italian" hurdy-gurdy man, also a "French" chef entering on the left, carrying a large peacock on a tray, and an African American servant spilling trays of food on the Englishman and the Chinese man. In a cradle on the floor next to Columbia are two infants labeled "Malagasy" and "Corean." Uncle Sam is offering a toast to the well-dressed German man standing at center. Puck, standing on the front side of the table, holding his lithographic pencil, offers a bouquet of flowers. Hanging from a garland on the wall in the background, beneath the heading "Germantown 1683-1883," are portraits of Baron von "Steuben," George "Washington," and Marquis de "Lafayette."

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Uncle Sam (Symbolic character); Columbia (Symbolic character); African Americans--Employment; International relations--Centennial celebrations, etc.; Dinners and dining; Toasts; Organ grinders; Washington, George, 1732-1799; Lafayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert Du Motier, marquis de, 1757-1834; Steuben, Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin, Baron von, 1730-1794

Date: 1883-10-03

The bogus workingman and his lonesome boom

Description:

Benjamin F. Butler is a laborer standing next to a box of "Tools for Exhibition Purposes," with "Butler's Valet" next to him. At the valet's feet are papers labeled "R. R. Stock [and] Monopolists' fees" and behind him is a safe labeled "Bonds." Butler is holding papers labeled "Speech." Through a window is seen a tattered man standing next to signs that state "Grand Butler Mass Meeting" and "Please Keep Order and Don't Crowd." Caption: Butler (to his valet) - "Keep an eye on the valuables, while I go out and address the mass-meeting!"

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: Domestics; Valets; Public speaking; African Americans--Employment; Deception; Presidents--Elections; Butler, Benjamin F. (Benjamin Franklin), 1818-1893

Date: 1884-09-10

The summer version of "Pay! Pay!! Pay!!!"

Description:

A larger-than-life-sized African American man labeled "Head Waiter" stands at the entrance to the "Dining Room," receiving a tip from a well-to-do man standing at the head of a long line of patrons of "The Um - Te - Ump Summer Hotel."

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: African Americans--Employment; Social classes; Waiters

Date: 1901-06-05

Letter from T. R. Campbell to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

T. R. Campbell owns and operates a mill in North Carolina that is being boycotted because he hired African American employees and treated them well. He argues in favor of better treatment, but not social equality, for African Americans. Campbell requests funding so that he can continue his work and "make a great success for Christ and the Party."

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Finance, Personal; Race discrimination; African Americans--Employment; African Americans--Civil rights; African Americans--Politics and government; North Carolina

Date: 1901-08-24

Letter from Booker T. Washington to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Booker T. Washington asks President Roosevelt to defer appointment of Judge Roulhac as district attorney until Washington confers with James Sullivan Clarkson. He has a resolution that he will suggest to Clarkson, who will then convey it to Roosevelt. Washington spoke to Edgar S. Wilson in New Orleans, Louisiana. Wilson is in fine shape, particularly if he can have two African American men appointed as deputy revenue collectors.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Judges--Selection and appointment; Public prosecutors; African Americans--Employment; Alabama; Louisiana--New Orleans; Clarkson, James Sullivan, 1842-1918; Wilson, Edgar S., 1858-1935; Roulhac, Thomas R., 1846-1907

Date: 1902-11-06

Summary of letter from William H. Brawley

Description:

William H. Brawley understands President Roosevelt's position regarding the marshalship and agrees with him. He doesn't believe that African Americans have the capacity to hold public office and opposes the appointment of William Demos Crum as Collector of the Port of Charleston.

Resource Type: Report

Subject: Local officials and employees--Selection and appointment; African Americans--Employment; African Americans--Politics and government; Race discrimination; South Carolina--Charleston; Brawley, William H., 1841-1916; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919; Crum, William Demos, 1859-1912

Date: 1902-12-09

Letter from William H. Brawley toTheodore Roosevelt

Description:

William H. Brawley has a low opinion of the Republican Party in South Carolina. He agrees with President Roosevelt regarding the Marshalship and he approves of not appointing William D. Crum to the Collectorship. Brawley expresses his belief that Crum's standing in the community would not suggest such an appointment and that that no one would "consider him for the place if he were not a colored man." Brawley disclaims racism and mentions fighting against the Ku Klux Klan while a solicitor in the 6th Circuit, but he also states that the efforts to improve the political rights of African Americans are "hindered rather than helped" by appointing them to jobs that "awaken resentments."

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: African Americans--Politics and government; African Americans--Employment; Race discrimination; Race relations; South Carolina; Ku Klux Klan (19th cent.); Crum, William Demos, 1859-1912

Date: 1902-12-09

Letter from William H. Moody to George B. Cortelyou

Description:

Secretary of the Navy William H. Moody informs Secretary Cortelyou that President Roosevelt has not appointed or reappointed any African Americans to the Navy Department. Roosevelt has also not given positions previously held by African American men to white men. In the Navy Department, Roosevelt has only appointed Moody and Assistant Secretary Charles H. Darling.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: African Americans--Politics and government; African Americans--Employment; Employees--Appointment, qualifications, tenure, etc.; United States. Navy; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919; Darling, Charles Hial, 1859-1944

Date: 1903-01-30

Industrial education of negroes

Description:

Newspaper article attacking Senator Depew for speaking favorably of Booker T. Washington's work and the industrial education of African Americans.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: African Americans--Education; African Americans--Employment; African Americans--Civil rights; Southern States; Tuskegee Institute; Depew, Chauncey M. (Chauncey Mitchell), 1834-1928; Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915

Date: 1903-06?

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