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John A. Logan in 1859

Description:

John Alexander Logan stands at center, holding a paper that states "No Interference with Slave-Hunters!" and looking over his left shoulder at two slave hunters rounding up a family of fugitive slaves. A similar scene is repeated in the background. Abraham Lincoln, William H. Seward, and Charles Sumner are standing on the left, watching in anger and with restraint. Caption: "You call it the dirty work of the Democratic Party to catch fugitive slaves for the Southern people. WE are willing to perform that dirty work." --John Alexander Logan, in the Illinois State Legislature, Dec. 9th, 1859.

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: African Americans--Civil rights; Fugitive slaves; Bounty hunters; Logan, John Alexander, 1826-1886; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872; Sumner, Charles, 1811-1874

Date: 1884-07-09

The four Rips; or, twenty years behind the age

Description:

Illustration shows Uncle Sam seated at a table in front of "Uncle Sam's Inter-State Market" with a businessman labeled "Northern Capital" on the right and an agricultural producer labeled "Southern Goods - Cotton, Sugar, Tobacco, Whiskey" on the left. Standing before the table are James G. Blaine labeled "Bloody Shirt", John Sherman, Whitelaw Reid, and Joseph B. Foraker, who all have long flowing hair and beards like Rip Van Winkle; Blaine is leaning on a rifle labeled "Shot Gun." Two young African American men are sitting on a bale of cotton and a keg of "Tobacco" in the lower right corner and in the middle ground African Americans are harvesting cotton. In the background, along the shores of a harbor, is a prosperous city. Caption: Uncle Sam "My fossil friends, the War ended twenty years ago. Have you been sleeping ever since?"

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: American Civil War (1861-1865); Uncle Sam (Symbolic character); Van Winkle, Rip (Fictitious character); Sectionalism (United States); Businesspeople; African Americans--Civil rights; Commerce; Older people; Beards; Blaine, James Gillespie, 1830-1893; Sherman, John, 1823-1900; Reid, Whitelaw, 1837-1912; Foraker, Joseph Benson, 1846-1917

Date: 1885-09-16

The lynching problem

Description:

Print shows a southern vigilante holding a rope with a noose and a "Sheriff" holding a paper that states "2000 dollars must be paid by the county, for each lynching. Law of South Carolina." An African American man cowers behind the sheriff. A large building labeled "Courthouse" is in the background. Caption: If motives of humanity and justice won't stop them, may be this will.

Resource Type: Cartoon

Subject: African Americans--Civil rights; Lynching; Sheriffs; Legislation; Courthouses; Vigilance committees; South Carolina

Date: 1899-06-14

Speech of Gov. Roosevelt at St. Louis, Monday night, Oct. 9, 1900

Description:

Draft of a speech with handwritten corrections. Governor Roosevelt campaigns against William Jennings Bryan and his policies. Bryan's prophecies regarding the need for free silver have not come true and the country has prospered. Roosevelt advocates national action to combat the complex problems of trusts. He points out the plight of African Americans and that Bryan seems more concerned with the rights of the "bandits" in the Philippines. Roosevelt doesn't want the United States to shirk their duty in the Philippines and believes that liberty will come to the islands under the American flag.

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: American Civil War (1861-1865); Philippine American War (Philippines : 1899-1902); Campaign speeches; Silver question; Bimetallism; Trusts, Industrial--Government policy; Business and politics; Constitutional amendments; African Americans--Civil rights; Imperialism--Moral and ethical aspects; Liberty; Philippines; Switzerland; Bryan, William Jennings, 1860-1925; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865; Aguinaldo, Emilio, 1869-1964

Date: 1900-10-09?

Letter from T. R. Campbell to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

T. R. Campbell owns and operates a mill in North Carolina that is being boycotted because he hired African American employees and treated them well. He argues in favor of better treatment, but not social equality, for African Americans. Campbell requests funding so that he can continue his work and "make a great success for Christ and the Party."

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Finance, Personal; Race discrimination; African Americans--Employment; African Americans--Civil rights; African Americans--Politics and government; North Carolina

Date: 1901-08-24

Letter from Richard Harding Davis to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Richard Harding Davis supports President Roosevelt's decision to host Booker T. Washington at the White House and describes the decision as an "act of every day civility." The South doesn't realize that the Civil War is over and that the slave question has been decided.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: American Civil War (1861-1865); Dinners and dining; Etiquette; African Americans--Politics and government; African Americans--Civil rights; Racism; Race relations; Press and politics; Southern States; Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915

Date: 1901-10-17

Letter from John S. Cooper to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

John S. Cooper recounts a conversation he overheard that included Grover Cleveland during his presidency. Cleveland stated that he believed the improvement of the lives of African Americans was a major achievement of his administration. Cleveland's comments made a strong impression on Cooper.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: African Americans--Politics and government; African Americans--Civil rights; Equality; Cleveland, Grover, 1837-1908; Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915

Date: 1901-10-18

Letter from Albion W. Tourgee to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

Consul Tourgee commends President Roosevelt for hosting and dining with Booker T. Washington at the White House. He no longer believes Christianity and education can solve the problems of racism. Tourgee recounts an incident with Roosevelt in which Roosevelt stated he would never appoint an African American as a judge. He praises Roosevelt for his change of heart regarding African Americans.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Dinners and dining; Race relations; Race relations--Religious aspects--Christianity; Racism; African Americans--Civil rights; Judges--Selection and appointment; African American judges; France; Washington (D.C.); White House (Washington, D.C.); Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915

Date: 1901-10-21

Letter from J. F. Hanson to Theodore Roosevelt

Description:

J. F. Hanson comments about racial problems in the south and the relationship between the Republican Party and southern states. He believes that the southern states hold a prejudice against the Republican Party but it is important for the south and the country as a whole that the Republican Party remain in power.

Resource Type: Letter

Subject: Race relations; Racism; African Americans--Politics and government; African Americans--Civil rights; Employees--Appointment, qualifications, tenure, etc.; Southern States; Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- )

Date: 1901-10-23

A "most damnable outrage"

Description:

Newspaper article defending President Roosevelt's decision to host Booker T. Washington at the White House.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Dinners and dining; Racism; African Americans--Civil rights; Sectionalism (United States); Southern States; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919; Washington, Booker T., 1856-1915

Date: 1901-10-26

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