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The boy scout movement

Description:

Margaret Sanger writes about the Boy Scouts, stating that the movement was imported to the United States from Great Britain and "seized upon most enthusiastically by America's grown up boy scout, Theodore Roosevelt." Sanger criticized the Boy Scouts, claiming the organization was intended to train boys to obey and prepare them for the military, support the capitalists, and continue the oppression of the working class. She argues that President Roosevelt was "delighted" to "hasten" these ideas upon American society.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Boy Scouts; Capitalism--Influence; Working class; Working class families; Great Britain; Boy Scouts of America; Boy Scouts Association (Great Britain); Young Men's Christian Associations of the United States and British Provinces; Catholic Church; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919; Edward VII, King of Great Britain, 1841-1910

Date: 1912-04-06

The woman rebel: No gods no masters

Description:

Margaret Sanger writes that the first edition of her journal The Woman Rebel was returned by the postmaster because it violated anti-obscenity laws. Sanger sarcastically declares her intentions to be more patriotic, claiming she will follow former President Roosevelt's example and champion for large families. However, while Roosevelt stated the country needed large families to prevent race suicide, Sanger claims that large numbers of children are necessary to "uphold" all of America's areas of failing--public schools, factories, asylums, prisons, courts, and "slums"--in a satirical critique. 

Resource Type: Journal article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Periodicals; Birth control--Public opinion; Obscenity (Law); Censorship; United States. Post Office Department; United States. Postmaster General; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1914-04

History of education

Description:

In her draft of a speech in response to her trial on The Woman Rebel dissemination, Margaret Sanger discusses social problems and the manner in which birth control can address these issues and help the working class. Sanger critiques anti-obscenity laws and the notion of birth control education as pornography. She asks whether former President Roosevelt is truly moral for encouraging large families and she is immoral for encouraging small families. Sanger also addresses the charge that her article concerning an assassination attempt incited murder. She includes quotations from well-known ancient orators and writers and also from Roosevelt, claiming that if these writings on assassination are not accused of inciting murder, she should not be accused of such either. 

Resource Type: Speech

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Public opinion; Birth control--Moral and ethical aspects; Obscenity (Law); Censorship; Working class; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Motherhood; Pornography--Censorship; Poverty; Abortion; Prostitution; Assassination--Moral and ethical aspects; United States. Post Office Department; United States. Postmaster General; Charles Scribner's Sons; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1916-01

Scores U.S. law which bars talk on birth control

Description:

At an engagement at the Hotel Wisconsin, Margaret Sanger discussed birth control, claiming that wealthy women were aware how to prevent pregnancy but working class women did not have access to this information. Sanger indignantly protested that while former President Roosevelt was allowed to travel around the United States and urge couples to have large families, she was not allowed to provide information to women to prevent numerous pregnancies. She further argued that the immorality argument leveled against birth control was identical to the one leveled earlier against women in higher education.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Moral and ethical aspects; Birth control--Press coverage; Birth control--Public opinion; Families; Women in higher education; Immorality; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Wisconsin--Milwaukee; Hotel Wisconsin (Milwaukee, Wis.); Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1916-04-27

Limit families: Better humanity

Description:

The Detroit News reports that Margaret Sanger spoke on birth control education, arguing for the benefit it would hold for the working class. Sanger discussed the idea of race suicide and how former President Roosevelt claimed that his presidency would end the problem in the United States by encouraging large families. She stated, "Nobody called Roosevelt immoral for advocating larger families. I wonder if you will call me immoral for advocating small families."

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Press coverage; Birth control--Public opinion; Birth control--Moral and ethical aspects; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Working class; Child labor; New York (State); Michigan--Detroit; Japan; Netherlands; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1916-05-03

Birth control expounded here

Description:

The Indianapolis Star reports on Margaret Sanger's speech about birth control at the Claypool Hotel in Indianapolis, Indiana. Sanger discussed the importance of providing birth control information to working class women in order to reduce and prevent infant and maternal mortality, poverty, abortion, and prostitution. She argued that if former President Roosevelt was allowed to travel the country and urge families to have many children, she should be allowed to give poor women the information they needed. In reference to Roosevelt's concerns over race suicide, Sanger stated, "I say the race ought to commit suicide unless it can take care of its children better."

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Press coverage; Birth control--Public opinion; Birth control--Moral and ethical aspects; Abortion; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Infants (Newborn)--Mortality; Motherhood; New Zealand; Netherlands; Indiana--Indianapolis; Claypool Hotel (Indianapolis, Ind.); Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919; Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865

Date: 1916-05-16

Woman rebel scores Roosevelt as enslaver of mothers in U.S.

Description:

In an interview with Margaret Sanger, the Denver Post reports on the reformer's efforts in the area of birth control and her desire for "better babies or no babies." Sanger claimed that former President Roosevelt had "enslaved" American women and children with his policies and ideas concerning family reproduction. She stated that Roosevelt's efforts in encouraging American couples to rear large families was "willy-nilly" and that the former president's personality encouraged people, particularly women, to listen to him. Sanger emphatically called Roosevelt "foolish" and accused him of creating "tenants for our insane asylums, prisons and alms' houses."

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Public opinion; Birth control--Press coverage; Obscenity (Law); Families; Working class; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Colorado--Denver; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1916-05-17

"Woman rebel" tells need of birth control

Description:

The Denver Express reports on Margaret Sanger's birth control speech at Marble Hall in Denver, Colorado. Sanger discussed the benefit of birth control for the working class. She also took issue with former President Roosevelt's widely-disseminated ideas about race suicide, stating that if the race cannot take better care of its children, then it should commit suicide.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Press coverage; Birth control--Public opinion; Working class; Working class women--Health and hygiene; Poverty; Colorado--Denver; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1916-05-28

Eager hundreds 'hitch' chairs to hear message

Description:

Gene Baker reports on the crowd of women who "came in droves" to hear Margaret Sanger speak. Sanger, who Baker described as "feminine" with "personal warmth," scientifically and clearly described the issue of birth control. She criticized the censorship of the United States Postal Service and former President Roosevelt's sense of morality. Sanger asked the audience who was more moral: she, for encouraging small, responsible families, or Roosevelt, for encouraging American couples to have many children? At this, Baker reports that Sanger received a great deal of applause, indicating that "the Rooseveltian theory would never win him many of the women's votes."

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Press coverage; Birth control--Attitudes; Birth control--Citizen participation; Birth control--Public opinion; Birth control--Moral and ethical aspects; Motherhood; Motherhood--Government policy; Family; Family--Government policy; Suffrage--Women; Censorship; Working class women--Health and hygiene; California--Oakland; United States. Post Office Department; Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1916-06-15

Mrs. Sanger defies courts before 3,000

Description:

The New York Times reports that Margaret Sanger spoke to a large crowd at Carnegie Hall in New York the previous evening. Sanger spoke about birth control and the importance of disseminating the information to women, particularly women of the working classes who are prevented from the education that upper class women receive. Sanger criticized former President Roosevelt, stating that he was freely allowed to discuss female reproduction when he encouraged large families. She discussed Roosevelt's home of Oyster Bay, New York, claiming that sixty-three "poor mothers" from the area had sought her help on matters of birth control.

Resource Type: Newspaper article

Subject: Birth control; Birth control--Government policy; Birth control--Press coverage; Birth control--Public opinion; Obscenity (Law); Censorship; Arrest; Working class; Working class women--Health and hygiene; New York (State)--New York--Roosevelt Island; New York (State)--Oyster Bay; Carnegie Hall (New York, N.Y.); Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919

Date: 1917-01-30

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